Articles tagged Frank Williams

Page 70, July 2008

"I went from Sports Personality of the year to being a nasty smell."

Damon Hill’s turbulent relationship with Williams led to him losing his drive on the brink of becoming World Champion. The men at the heart of this tale talk candidly for the first time about what went wrong By Andrew Benson This is the story of how Damon Hill came to lose his drive and win the World Championship at the same time. It is about the disintegration of a professional relationship,...

Page 31, November 1978

The Formula One Scene

The 1978 season was proving to be a jolly good one until about midway when it all started to go wrong. It had opened with a most interesting collection of variables that were going to prove or disprove themselves as the year went on. World Champion Niki Lauda had left Ferrari and joined the Alfa Romeo powered Brabham team under Bernie Ecclestone, Ferrari had forsaken Goodyear and was contracted...

Page 48, August 1981

The art of giving up gracefully - Jonathan Williams

For every driver who makes it to the select world of Formula One, there must be 20 who have set off down this ambitious road and failed to make the grade for one reason or another. In the mid-1960s there was a whole host of enthusiastic young British drivers contesting the 1-litre Formula 3 category, all of them hell-bent on making their names in the upper echelons of the sport. They included...

Page 74, October 1979

A Question of Numbers

Talking to Patrick Head, the designer of the Frank Williams team cars, he queried why the specialist motor magazines insisted on quoting the chassis numbers of his cars with two noughts before the number, i.e. 004. "There is no way we are going to build 999 cars, so why not call the cars 1, 2, 3, 4," he said. Sound Head logic I agreed, but pointed out, on the car by which we were standing, the...

Page 127, July 2004

News

1982 San Marino strike The week before the race the FIA decreed that running cars under the 580kg limit was not acceptable. In consequence, Frank Williams withdrew as did Bernard Ecclestone and Colin Chapman, and the McLaren team. Others among the Cosworth powered 'special builders' who have to toe the line in the Ecclestone-Mosley FOCA grouip also withdrew. Why some of the FOCA teams went on...

Page 32, February 1979

Notes on the cars at Buenos Aires

Lotus: Gone are the sleek black and gold creations from Hethel, they are now green with yellow lining. Gone too is the fatuous title "John Player Special", they are now "Martini-Lotus" (though Motor Sport has never considered a Lotus anything other than a Lotus). The reason for these changes is the end of the financial support from the John Player tobacco firm, after a long and successful...

Page 23, April 1975

The Race of Champions

And other events Brands Hatch, March 16th The season "opener" saw a small but varied entry for the combined F1 and F5000 race over 40 laps of the full circuit at Brands Hatch. It gave the opportunity for some of the stars to appear before the British public, and some newcomers the opportunity to try their hand at Formula One. In appalling conditions of cold and damp, practice saw only one non-...

Page 98, November 2014

Too free a spirit for Ferrari

He started only one GP, but had a better track record than the wider world appreciated. This is our tribute to the unconventional Jonathan Williams, who always knew there was more to life than racing. He passed away recently Writer: Adam Cooper Given that he lived a quiet and low-key life in Spain, Jonathan Williams was always bemused by the ability of a certain group of people to track him down...

Page 19, November 2014

Nigel Roebuck

A sense of perspective The Ferrari conundrum Farewell to a friend Back in 1964 three British drivers – Jim Clark, Graham Hill, John Surtees – went to the final Grand Prix, in Mexico, to settle the world championship. In the end the title went to Surtees, after Clark’s Lotus had led all the way until its engine seized on the last lap, and Hill’s BRM had been delayed by a coming-together with...

Page 76, March 2011

Lunch with... Alex Wurz

Tall men are not meant to make top racing drivers, yet he had a busy 12-year career as F1 racer and tester. Now his heart is set on a third Le Mans winBy Simon Taylor Alex Wurz looks like Hollywood’s idea of a racing driver: alert, clear-eyed, charming yet steely, wiry and very fit. And tall. But, as we know, in real life the most successful racing drivers tend to be little guys. It’s not just...

Pages

Subscribe to Motor Sport

Please select one of the following subscription offerings to gain uninterrupted access to over 92 years of Motor Sport archive.

Noticed a mistake on this page?

Tell Us About It