Articles tagged Richard Williams

Page 108, October 2014

Sterling silver

To conclude our trilogy of significant French motor sport anniversaries, we rewind 60 years to the day that Mercedes-Benz returned to Grand Prix racing – and obliterated its rivals Writer Richard Williams The first outsider to catch sight of the new Silver Arrow hadn’t a clue what he was looking at. Which was a relief to the Mercedes personnel, who allowed the photographer George Monkhouse to...

Page 8, October 2014

Matters of moment

"It makes you feel sick, actually, the whole FIFA thing, the corruption at the top is nauseating. Sepp Blatter likewise has run it like a dictatorship for so long and he comes up with so much nonsense.” Good on Gary Lineker. England’s second-most prolific goalscorer was deservedly considered a ‘golden boy’ of British sport during his playing career, and he’s carried that momentum into his life as...

Page 209, July 2014

Historic scene with... Gordon Cruickshank

Astons in the blood A trip to Surrey uncovers a cache of Britain's finest, and a man with a fund of knowledge I’ve read about Aston expert Richard Williams over the years but hadn’t met him until a motoring friend took me along to the eponymous firm he runs in Cobham, tactfully camouflaged behind suburban bungalows. R S Williams has been tuning, restoring and improving Astons since the 1960s, but...

Page 116, July 2014

Three colours red

Alfa Romeo, Maserati and Ferrari flew the flag for Italy with elegant style – and success. How they did it, so rapidly after the ravages of war, is a remarkable tale grounded in politics and passionWriter Richard Williams Alfa Romeo’s team of cherry-red Tipo 158s took the first three places in the inaugural round of the Formula 1 world championship at Silverstone on May 13, 1950, with Nino Farina...

Page 91, May 2014

Mallory Spark

Jim Clark had yet to etch his name on the broader racing conscience by the spring of 1959, but four victories in one afternoon were a hint of greatness to comeWriter: Richard Williams Its paintwork so dark that on a murky day the green could have been taken for black, the big Lister-Jaguar appeared to flex its shoulders as it powered through the downhill left-hand kink before the pit straight....

Page 12, May 2014

Contributors

Cricket lover, walking encyclopaedia, former Motor Sport editor, professional Mancunian: Paul Fearnley is all of these and relishes a challenge. This month, his missions embraced the 1964 Indy 500, the last to be won by a front-engined car, and the fleeting, fascinating duel between Ayrton Senna and Michael Schumacher. How might that have panned out, given time? A young Richard Williams hadn’t...

Page 70, March 2014

Champion of the revolution

Phil Manzanera is best known as guitarist with pioneering 1970s rock band Roxy Music. As a boy, though, he was a privileged witness to the 1958 Cuban Grand Prix, when Juan Manuel Fangio found himself a hostage to rebel kidnappers. But instead of condemning his polite captors, the great man befriended themWriter: Richard Williams While the racing engines revved, the small boy sat with his mother...

Page 12, March 2014

Contributors

As an admirer of Mark Webber, it made sense for editor-in-chief Nigel Roebuck to pay the Aussie a visit in the off-season to talk about the Grand Prix world he’s leaving behind and what awaits him at Porsche. Nigel’s Reflections special starts on page 50. Andrew Frankel brings us the cover story this month after a dream drive in the car known universally as Uhlenhaut’s coupé – another gem for his...

Page 10, July 1989

World Sportscar Championship: Dijon 480-kms

That magic ingredient What seemed like a formality for the Sauber Mercedes team at Dijon on May 21, and therefore a contest for third place, turned into a splendid success for an underdog Porsche, a Reinhold Joest 962C driven by Bob Wollek and Frank Jelinski. It might seem rather far-fetched to describe a Joest Porsche as an underdog, but it had been almost two years since a product of Weissach...

Page 38, April 2003

Blind AMbition

Twenty-three years after its Le Mans win, Aston Martin returned to La Sarthe. Sort of. Richard Heseltine explains how a one-time club racer fired up a sleeping giant and got a rude awakening When club racer-turned-entrant Robin Hamilton moved into the big league with his ill-starred Nimrod Group C venture, he was tarred with the more derogatory connotations of the word 'amateur'. But he was...

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