The way of Things

7/1-e

ITH the remarkable increase in the number of cars on the road, and the position of

motoring as one of the essentials of existence, there have arisen various prophets who have stated that motoring as a sport will cease to be. In actual fact the utility side of the industry has thrown the sporting side into greater relief than ever before, and the cult of the sports car has steadily grown until nearly every make is marketed in this form. Elsewhere in this issue of MOTOR SPoicr appear announcements of two new

nouncements of two new sports models of famous makes to show that this is the line on which enterprising manufacturers must work, if the keenest and most discriminating section of motorists is to be persuaded to take notice of their wares.

Both the small and medium capacity sports car is enjoying a steadily increasing popularity, but there is one aspect of the case which should be watched. The name" sports "must not lose its meaning, and merely become a description of a shape of body. Today we are offered a better selection of low-priced cars

of good performance than ever, and drivers should appreciate and take advantage of this fact by entering in sporting events so far as time and their pockets will permit.

Reliability trials provide inexpensive sport which greatly enhances the pleasure to be obtained from owning a good car, while a stiff sporting trial is the best possible training for the competent handling of a car under all conditions. Recent trials results have shown that the standard

of driving is by no means high, and this can only be improved by an increased entry for all such events by drivers who have taken to the game to do their best at it, and not merely as a method of passing the time.

The fine article by H. B. Browning on succeeding pages, describing his experiences in the Monte Carlo Rally, shows that motoring can still be a real adventure, and the trials we run in this country can at least provide good sport.

Therefore, to those of our readers who own sports cars, and yet have not participated in competitions, we would say—try it, you will find it worth while.