December 1998

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We are, I hope with some justification, quite proud that, for some reason or other, drivers seem happy not simply to talk to us but also to be frank about experiences which cannot be in the least bit...
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Wilhelm Karmann Jr The creator of the Karmann Ghia coupe, Wilhelm Karmann Jr, has died, aged 83. When his father passed on in 1952, Karmann Jr took the reins of the eponymous Osnabruck company which...
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It was less than ten years ago that the idea of a British car winning a Grand Prix was considered by most people to be impossible. There were British-built green cars in Grand Prix racing, but they...
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It's been a long, long season. Three thousand miles of racing. Untold days of testing, untold nights of preparation. Nine unrelenting months of sheer hard work across five continents. In the end, for...
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Sir, After marvelling at and enjoying, as a spectator, Lord March's Goodwood Revival Meeting celebrating the Spirit of Goodwood, I was disappointed to see that the Spirit of Goodwood did not extend...
Sir, Matthew Franey's article on the ex-Protheree E-type, CUT 7 was another MOTOR SPORT masterpiece which I read with extra interest as Dick was, in this area, our local hero when it came to motor...
Sir, I am writing to say how pleased I was to see the anti-jingoistic bit in your October Editorial. Yes, I agree - Schumacher was born in the wrong place to receive English warmth and respect. I'm...
Sir, In the October issue, your editorial observes similarities between Senna and Schumacher; I quite agree. You seem to think that this is a good thing - I do not. Ayrton Senna was the first driver...
Sir, I refer to Gordan Cruickshank's article in the October issue of MOTOR SPORT — 'Mad, Bad and Dangerous to know'. I was pleased to see included one of my favourite oddities, the Trossi-Monaco, but...
Sir, I know I risk a fatwa for writing this letter but wonder if I am alone in feeling increasingly uncomfortable about the Great Goodwood Revival. Perhaps "You had to be there", but from where I'm...
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Sir, I hope you will print this letter as this is a big 'thank you' to all those readers and teams/drivers who replied to my letter in the June 1998 edition of MOTOR SPORT, asking for information for...
Sir, I have just read your account of driving the Sebring Frazer Nash at Goodwood. I wonder if you knew that Dickie Stoop flew with us at Westhampnett in early 1941, 610 Squadron being based on the...
Sir, Following your recent series of articles on disused continental circuits may I make a small contribution to no longer used English competition venues. In 1968 I visited the Firle hillclimb...
Sir, I enjoyed very much Andrew Frankel's article in the November issue on the Ferrari 500. Colin Cambell, in his book The Sports Car - Its Design and Performance writes: "Only the genius of a...
Sir, I cannot help Barry Bloor regarding his first question about the circuit at Rouen, but the enclosed map of the Reims circuits should answer the second. The above map appeared in a detailed...
Sir, I am proud to be writing the biography of Mr Tom Wheatcroft who owns the Donington Park racing circuit and the world famous Donington Grand Prix collection in Derbyshire and am anxious for help...
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Much was made recently of the 'interminable' five-week gap between the penultimate and final races of the Formula One season. And certainly it was unusual, given Bernie Ecclestone's dislike of 'free...
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We can see they are different - but why? Matthew franey talks to some big players who say that talent alone is not enough. Senna, Fangio, Clark, Schumacher, Prost, Stewart, Mansell. It takes just a...
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It seems that those with a burning desire to win often carry that competitive spirit as excess baggage. On the race track it is a vital element of what makes them great, away from the circuit it...
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Would a Fangio or Clark be a match for a Senna or a Schumacher? It's a question that can never be answered, but if the ability to jump in a car and go quickly from lap one is anything to go by, then...
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Jan Magnussen was famously described by Jackie Stewart - who hired him to race for his fledgling GP team - as the most talented driver since Senna. But in his brief and fruitless time in F1, he...
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Still one of the hardest rallies, the RAC was once a by-word for toughness. John Davenport tells some first-hand forest tales. Ten days from the publication date of this issue of Motor Sport, the top...
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This Elite could have won Le Mans but became linked with Tragedy. Mike Lawrence examines the mystery, while Sir John Whitmore steps behind the wheel again. THE CAR In 1959 the Lotus Elite made a huge...
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Phil Llewellin returns to the place where his motor-journalism career began and rediscovers hillclimbing's unique and timeless atmosphere. Accelerating like a clothyard arrow at Agincourt, McLaren's...
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The F5A was the most successful of all Fittipaldi's Grand Prix designs. Andrew Frankel takes to the track in Emerson's finest. Introductions to Formula One cars come no better. The team is relaxed,...
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In the swinging sixties, crime sometimes did pay...for motor racing. Gordon Cruickshank investigates Roy James, the great train robber. Like any other sport, motor racing can boast its share of shady...
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In 1970 and 1971 World Championship Sports Car racing saw the brief but unforgettable era of the Porsche 917 and Ferrari 512S and 512M prototypes, the most brutal, beautiful sportscars ever built....
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It might have gone down as a Touring Car classic, but the Ford Capri was John Fitzpatrick's nemesis. Adam Cooper reports. Touring Car fans got quite excited when Nigel Mansell joined this year's BTCC...
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It started as a French armaments company making rifles for Napoleon III, and became one of the most admired early car marques. Bill Boddy recalls the Hotchkiss Company. I think it is safe to say that...
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The kind men at Aston Martin have designed a works-built 600bhp Vantage. Gavin Conway staps himself in for the ride of his life. Photographer Andrew Yeadon's eyes are better than most. They can hang...
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Or so he should have been. Robert Edwards looks at his rarely remembered life and concludes there is no justice in this world. It is purely an age thing, I suppose, this, peculiar tendency we have to...
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A moment's misjudgement by a colleague tore a certain third Le Mans win from Hans Stuck's grasp, but he recalls the fight to undo the damage as one of his best races. The race I remember most is not...
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I read with amusement the editor's comments on how the V16 BRMs lived up to their original failures at the marvellous Goodwood Revival Meeting. Much has been written about Raymond Mays' too ambitious...
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The 1998 Penrite Oil Award for outstanding achievement in the historic vehicle world has been awarded to Brooklands Museum for its recent developments, including the acquisition of the lap-record...
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Among the wealth of motor racing history it is possible to find interesting side-tracks from the mainstream of events. For example, the 1922 Targa Florio. This was a very tough event for cars at that...
This traditional event, dating from 1939, this year reverted to the 200-mile navigational road-run on the Saturday for cars less suitable for the Sunday trial. Thus, of the 38 entries, 32 were...
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How pleasing it is to have stamps on one's letters recalling Britain's successes in the LSR field, with particular reference to these of the Campbells, although sad that Richard Nobel's great...
I was sorry to receive news from South Africa that George Tuck had died aged 89. When I began to road-test MGs for MOTOR SPORT, he was the handsome, efficient Publicity Officer at Abingdon, working...
In 1947 the Junior CC, with the Jersey MC/LCC organised the first international road race to be held in Britain after the war, a notable milestone won by Reg Parnell's Maserati. The race was repeated...

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