February 2001

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They came from opposite ends of the motorsport spectrum. One had been imbued in all things fast and mechanical from an early age by his garage-owning, racing-mad father. The other stumbled into the...
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When John Cooper succumbed to cancer on Christmas Eve, he died not only as one of the most profoundly influential characters in motor racing history, but also one of the most widely popular. Here we...
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Legendary British driver Brian Redman might return from the USA to contest a round of the FORCE's Formula 5000 Transatlantic Challenge series, after agreeing to put his name to the trophy for its...
Mercedes-Benz's centenary and a pageant marking the 50 years since Ferrari's maiden GP victory are the key themes of the ninth Festival of Speed in Goodwood Park, guaranteeing a bevy of stars and...
The majestic St Jovite Circuit, home to the Canadian Grand Prix in 1968 and '70, and the very first Can-Am Challenge round in 1966, is to reopen for international events this season as Le Circuit...
One of the technically brilliant but ill-stared 'twin-chassis' JPS Lotus 88 Formula One cars, banned from the world championship by the FIA in mid-1981, is to race for the first time, in this year's...
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Of all the characters in off-track motorsport, none was more splendidly eccentric than twice RAC British Hillclimb champion Sir Nicholas Williamson, who died on New Year's Eve, aged 63. The dashing...
Walter Hayes, the 'Father of the DFV', Formula One's most successful engine, has died, aged 76. This eloquent and intelligent former Vice-President of Ford Motor Company, and past Vice-President of...
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Sir, I really enjoyed the article on Tony Brise in the December 2000 issue. You must surely be following this up with a similar feature on his great racing contemporary, Roger Williamson? I took the...
Sir, Of the many positive things to come from the agreement between the BRDC and Octagon, what delights me the most is that Brands Hatch will retain its classic track layout As a spectator there...
Sir, I was delighted to read the superb article on Tony Brise in the December 2000 issue. David Tremayne captured the essence of Tony, who would've gone on to great things given the chance. During my...
Sir, In his December column, the excellent Simon Taylor hit several nails firmly and squarely on the head. Why should there not be a series of nonchampionship events for Formula One cars? I envisage...
Sir, It was fascinating to read Mark Hughes' piece about Renault's early Fl aspirations in the late 1970s and early '80s. For the sake of accuracy, however, I should point out that the Renault...
Sir, The Turbo Years were indeed one of the most thrilling periods in motor racing, as your articles made very clear in the January 2001 issue. The picture of Ayrton Senna in the 'old' 1G183B Toleman...
Sir, Your magazine continues to offer a valuable insight into Indy racing, with driver features on the likes of Jiminy Bryan. In reading these articles I am constantly reassessing who was who in...
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One way or another, every Formula One driver over the past 23 years has cause to be grateful to Professor Sid Watkins. More than a handful owe their very lives to his inspired skill at the trackside...
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Mario Andretti is not given to hero-worship. He will readily concede that Alberto Ascari was the man who fired in him the ambition to race cars, but that was an adolescent thing. In 1954, when aged...
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Interlagos, first round of the 1976 championship, the dying moments of final qualifying. There's a face-to-face row going on in the McLaren pit. Team boss Teddy Mayer and his new driver James Hunt...
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The politics: part one The battle off the track was as fierce as the one Hunt and Lauda were waging on it. Paul Fearnley unravels the tangled web of intrigue that was 1976 The war had yet to truly...
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In Japan some passage of time is usually required before an event, an artefact or an era can be defined as a classic. But the 1976 Japanese GP was different In pouring rain on a circuit built in the...
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Two huge names in American racing were among F1's teams in 1976. David Malsher charts their roller-coaster ride A vigorous battle between the Parnelli of Mario Andretti and John Watson's Penske...
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The six-wheeled Tyrrell P34 was not only one of F1's most radical innovations, it still sharply divides opinion. Was it a technical leap or a blind alley? Andrew Frankel decides "I actually had the...
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Amazing Mount Panorama is famous for hard drivers, tougher crowds and mighty muscle cars — no place for whingers, says 'Pom' Marcus Simmons They don't build racetracks like Mount Panorama anymore....
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Rover Special If it looks right, it is right, the saying goes. But there are exceptions to every rule. Rover's only single-seater is hardly beautiful but, as Gordon Cruickshank discovers, it has...
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The one that got away Four of Rick Mear's 29 champcar wins came in the Indy 500 but, even 18 years on, the time he let the race slip from his gasp still aggravates him, he tells David Malsher The...
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Bill Boddy remembers some of the racing drivers and motoring personalities he has met One of the first personalities I went to see was Felix Scriven, because during the war I was posted to Harrogate...
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Vital but heavy, and liability in an accident, old-fashioned batteries simply do not pass motor racing's acid test. But then some bright spark in the aerospace industry solved the problem - with...
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In an era of superb, sensational sports-racers, Maserati built arguable the best looking, best handling of the lot. Paul Fearnley drives a 300S at the site of the model's most famous win, the...
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Inheriting and developing another's design can be a source of frustration for someone with his own clear idea of how things should be; but occasionally it proves a revelation. I was impressed by the...
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I was reading somewhere about the 100 best sportscars, which said the 30/98 Vauxhall seldom appeared at Brooklands. Come on! Even before WWI, Laurence Pomeroy's E-Type 30/98s were doing well at the...
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Not only are petrol prices astronomical but the cost and procedure for renewing a driving licence likewise. The paper licence is no longer valid. We all have to have Photocard licences, motorists...
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A recent comment on the George Eyston Chrysler saloon said it was surprising that the great racing driver and record man, who took the LSR to 357mph in his improbable 4700hp 'Thunderbolt', had given...
Some time back I marked out a standard as an unusual make to be raced at Brooklands. But, would you believe it, another joined in, in 1927. This one was even more improbable as it appeared to be a...
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The reference in the February issue of Classic &Sportscar to Felix Wankel's rotary engines and editor James Elliot's comment that every time he drives a rotary it starts him off on the theme that...
I have received a rather interesting photograph from Karl E Blochle of Zurich of his straight-eight Miller, showing the eight long air inlet pipes to the four dual carburettors, so long that they...

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