October 1943

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Adlards Motors, Ltd., once makers of Allard Specials, now on big-scale overhaul of Army vehicles. Many enthusiasts now serving with our mechanised forces must wonder what becomes of their vehicles...
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In this extremely erudite and absorbing article Cecil Clutton does his share of gazing into the future – a habit which excellent war-news encourages. His suggested designs have their claims carefully...
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Of recent months in these pages we have had Peter Hampton explaining to Mr. A. F. Brookes why he prefers Continental cars to British, and Mr. Brookes explaining that Hampton is barking up the wrong...
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In which Norman D. Routledge writes mainly of war-time motoring and mostly of Riley and Alvis cars. – Ed. My ardent love of cars and fast motoring was born in me, and fostered by my father. In my...
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How to get rich If you do not object to commercialising your enthusiasm for fast motor-cars, there is an infallible method awaiting you of entering a business which requires little capital and aims...
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It has been reported that a certain person has been masquerading as the northern representative of Motor Sport. We would like our readers, and anyone else whom it may concern, to know that Motor...
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We hear F/O G. L. Weaver still has his 1925 Aston-Martin stored away and hopes some day to give it the attention it deserves, although he has not seen it since he joined the R.A.F. early in 1940. Two...
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(Continued  from the  August issue.) Having thought about how and when 100 m.p.h. was achieved in various classes over varying distances, the next exercise would seem to centre round about 120 m.p.h...
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Sir, In these days of toil and salvage, when petrol and tyres are only obtainable by the lucky few, most of whom don't really appreciate them, we, who call ourselves enthusiasts, have to be content...

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