Articles tagged High Court

Page 173 of July 2014 archive issue thumbnail Page 173, July 2014

The end of innocence

Huge advances in safety corresponded with real-world political and financial machinations that would change motor racing forever. And it can all be traced back to one terrible Sunday afternoon Writer Andrew Benson Everything changed on the afternoon of May 1, 1994. When Ayrton Senna’s Williams hit the wall at Imola’s Tamburello corner, and the great Brazilian was killed by a suspension arm...

Page 70 of May 1966 archive issue thumbnail Page 70, May 1966

Letters from Readers.

N.B. —Opinions expressed are those of our Correspondents and "Motor Sport" does not necessarily associate itself with them.— Ed An appalling prospect. Sir, I commend you for your stand against bureaucratic control of the motorist. As an American motor enthusiast I have watched, through the window of your editorial and correspondence pages, the government of your country steadily approach the "...

Page 20 of August 2002 archive issue thumbnail Page 20, August 2002

Modern Times

While Ferrari scored a predicted 1-2 at Silverstone, helped no end by the superiority of Bridgestone's wet-weather tyres over Michelin's, the chief excitement of the meeting surrounded the financial fate of the Arrows team. Non-payment of £3.2 million-worth of bills due to Cosworth for the team's engines meant that, on Niki Lauda's orders, the vital electronic control units needed to run at...

Page 72 of February 1988 archive issue thumbnail Page 72, February 1988

Agreed Value?

Sir, Hopefully you will share my view concerning my experiences with "classic car agreed-value motor insurance" and will pass on via your letters page the quite outrageous situation I find myself in. In the early Sixties I purchased, from a well-known racing driver, a HWM fitted with a Jaguar Type C. engine. In 1983 this car was comprehensively rebuilt over a ten-month period by a professional...

Page 59 of August 1984 archive issue thumbnail Page 59, August 1984

1984 British Grand Prix race report - A four-ring circus

  After the Demolition Derbies in Detroit and Dallas, the Formula 1 "circus" must have breathed a sigh of relief when they returned to Europe to start some serious Grand Prix racing. The Brands Hatch circuit, scene for the 1984 British Grand Prix, may not be the best in the world for Formula 1 cars but at least it is quick and challenging in its own small way, with a lap speed of over 130 mph for...

Page 94 of March 2005 archive issue thumbnail Page 94, March 2005

A law unto himself

Family fur business in the winter, motorsport come the summer. Mike Anthony tells Anthony Pritchard about his racing days, in which he was courted then taken to court by Colin Chapman "I came out of the Army in 1947 and bought a Jag SS90," Mike Anthony recalls. "When I bought it I thought it was an SS100 — I didn't even know that there was an SS90. I modified its cylinder head and beat a lot of...

Page 53 of April 1989 archive issue thumbnail Page 53, April 1989

Veteran to classic

The roads of the 1920s At the end of 1928, Owen John was commenting in his diary on a Citroen Six chassis which was on display in the company's palatial Devonshire House showrooms in Piccadilly at the time of the Olympia Motor Show. I am not certain when Citroen took over these strategically placed and historic premises, but it was probably there that I went with my mother in 1924 to buy a car....

Page 20 of June 1931 archive issue thumbnail Page 20, June 1931

ITEMS OF INTEREST

ITEMS OF INTEREST FROM VARIOUS SOURCES The Phoenix Park Races. THE entries received up to date for the Grand Prix races . at Phoenix Park are sufficient to ensure that in most of the classes, at any rate, there will be keen struggles for supremacy. In the 750 c.c. class whole fleets of small cars have been.entered, the makes represented being, of course, M.G. and Austin. Particular interest, too...

Page 40 of May 1974 archive issue thumbnail Page 40, May 1974

A Bentley Mystery

Sir, Looking recently through a copy of an aviation year-book for 1931, I noted that amongst the civil aircraft registered for that year, was a DH60 Moth, G-ABAG, owned by Bentley Motors. Now, was this the company car? If so, who flew the aircraft and for what purpose? Perhaps your readers could provide an answer to these points? One would have thought that the company's financial situation was...

Page 62 of February 2003 archive issue thumbnail Page 62, February 2003

Me and my Arrows

At a time when Formula One cars generally looked very individual, the Shadow and Arrows of 1978 were startlingly similar - and more than one person noticed. Among them was Alan Henry, who describes how he - and arrows - were court in the act It's funny how a throwaway remark can sometimes boomerang. Walking into the Shadow team's garage at the 1978 Silverstone International Trophy meeting, I...

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