Articles tagged Brian Hart

Page 44 of November 2014 archive issue thumbnail Page 44, November 2014

Len Terry – obituary

Talented racing car designer Len Terry has died after a short illness, at the age of 90. Though involved with some 29 different organisations in his career, two marques in particular stand out – Eagle and Lotus. Terry masterminded Dan Gurney’s beautiful Eagle-Weslake Grand Prix car and many Lotuses, most notably the 1965 Indianapolis 500-winning Type 38. Never one to be awed by powerful men,...

Page 40 of June 1984 archive issue thumbnail Page 40, June 1984

Greene Cars

Only two Gilbys were ever built, an 1,100 cc sports car and a 1½-litre F1 car. Both were well designed, attractive, and prepared to the highest standards, yet in terms of absolute success, they merit no more than a footnote in motor racing history. What the project represented, though, is much more important. They were among the very last cars to be built and raced by a privateer with the object...

Page 57 of May 1963 archive issue thumbnail Page 57, May 1963

Mallory Park (April 15th)

Despite running a Brands Hatch Meeting on the same day, the B.R. & S.C.C.'s National British Mallory Park race meeting produced a good entry with the exception of the Formula Junior race, which had only eight contestants. The main attraction of the nine-race programme was the 20-lap Formule Libre race, won by Tony Marsh's 2 1/2-litre B.R.M. from John Taylor's 1 1/2-litre Cooper-Ford and Brian...

Page 22 of March 1984 archive issue thumbnail Page 22, March 1984

The Grand Prix

A non-(championship) event As the 1984 Grand Prix season for the World Championships was not due to start until March 25th with the Brazilian GP, and all the important teams were ready and raring to go by the end of January, the FOCA supreme organised a non-championship race to give them a pre-season try-out. Unfortunately the only country prepared to take this non-event was behind the Iron...

Page 26 of March 2014 archive issue thumbnail Page 26, March 2014

Web Spin

Gordon Kirby on Chapman’s last Indycar, the Lotus 64 Despite Andy Granatelli’s STP team’s worries for the 1969 Indy 500 practice, Andretti was able to set the pace, substantially quicker than anyone else, even Hill and Rindt in the factory 64s. “We were 4mph quicker than the second-placed car,” crew chief Jim McGee says, “even running four front tyres because Firestone hadn’t yet produced the...

Page 24 of August 1966 archive issue thumbnail Page 24, August 1966

The racing at Rouen

ROUEN, FRANCE, July 10th AT the Reims meeting the Formula Two and Formula Three races had been the supporting events, but at Rouen they were the main attractions and as support the V.S.C.C., in conjunction with their French equivalent, organised an Historic Car Race, which to many eyes was the major attraction! The Formula Two race was the third round in the French series, further events being...

Page 35 of September 1983 archive issue thumbnail Page 35, September 1983

Interview: Terry Hoyle

Unlike their racing counterparts, rallying's engine builders rarely receive recognition for their labours. It's hard to pin down the exact reason, but probably the situation isn't helped by the factory-based rally teams. In the "assemblatore" world of single-seater racing, the choice of engine builders and power units themselves is wide and varied. It's a buyers' market. Rallying has never got to...

Page 46 of May 1987 archive issue thumbnail Page 46, May 1987

The story of ... Rejo

Rejo times One of the less well known cars appearing in HSCC racing is Roger Ealand's Rejo Mk4. It is one of a dozen cars designed and built by Rod Easterling in the early sixties, cars so well constructed that Colin Chapman offered Easterling a job as a designer. Rejos were designed for club racing and within that restricted ambition were successful, their most outstanding characteristic being...

Page 56 of April 2001 archive issue thumbnail Page 56, April 2001

Up the creek without a saddle

Nuvolari, Rosemeyer, Surtees and Hailwood were bike stars who made seamless transitions to four wheels, from leaning to sliding. But a two-wheel hero's speed, balance and competitive edge doesn't guarantee four-wheel success. Fate can play a hand, as Colin Goodwin explains Geoff Duke Lancashire's Geoff Duke was at the top of motorcycle racing at the end of the 1951 season. He'd just won the 350...

Page 90 of December 1977 archive issue thumbnail Page 90, December 1977

Formula Two Review - The French Bow Out with Another Title

At the vast Estoril Autodrome in Portugal, little Rene Arnoux finally clinched the 1977 European Formula Two title in his Martini-Renault Mk. 22. He finished second in the October 1st penultimate round to put the coveted Championship safely out of reach of his few remaining rivals. Mindful of the bitter disappointment in 1976 when the Championship was stolen from his grasp in that incredible...

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