Articles tagged Don Nichols

Page 98 of April 2014 archive issue thumbnail Page 98, April 2014

All work no playboy

Forty years have passed since the sport lost one of its most misunderstood – and underrated – talentsWriter Andrew Frankel I’d known about the autobiography of Peter Revson for years, but never felt inclined to read it. Revson’s was a supporting role on the global motor racing stage: not a bit part for sure, but he was certainly no superstar either. Besides, Revson only got that far thanks to...

Page 20 of August 2002 archive issue thumbnail Page 20, August 2002

Modern Times

While Ferrari scored a predicted 1-2 at Silverstone, helped no end by the superiority of Bridgestone's wet-weather tyres over Michelin's, the chief excitement of the meeting surrounded the financial fate of the Arrows team. Non-payment of £3.2 million-worth of bills due to Cosworth for the team's engines meant that, on Niki Lauda's orders, the vital electronic control units needed to run at...

Page 25 of February 1977 archive issue thumbnail Page 25, February 1977

Argentine Grand Prix

Buenos Aires, January 9th Although Argentina is mere, thousands of miles away from the recognised European "home" of Formula One Grand Prix circuit racing, it has organised qualifying rounds in the World Championship intermittently ever since 1953, although there was a gap of 12 years between Bruce McLaren's victory in a Cooper-Climax in 1960 and Jackie Stewart's win with a Tyrrell-Cosworth five...

Page 62 of February 2003 archive issue thumbnail Page 62, February 2003

Me and my Arrows

At a time when Formula One cars generally looked very individual, the Shadow and Arrows of 1978 were startlingly similar - and more than one person noticed. Among them was Alan Henry, who describes how he - and arrows - were court in the act It's funny how a throwaway remark can sometimes boomerang. Walking into the Shadow team's garage at the 1978 Silverstone International Trophy meeting, I...

Page 98 of April 2009 archive issue thumbnail Page 98, April 2009

Three blokes and one chap

A small team but a lot of manpower went into creating Peter Bryant’s unique titanium Can-Am car. If only the rewards had been more forthcoming… In racing, new ideas are high-risk. Get it right and you’re a visionary. Get it wrong and you lose, publicly. McLaren MP4/1 – first carbon-fibre chassis, changed the world. Ti22 – first titanium chassis, evaporated without trace. But it so nearly...

Page 24 of July 1970 archive issue thumbnail Page 24, July 1970

Can-Am 1970

Mosport The Canadian-American Challenge Cup Series entered its fifth year with the death of Bruce McLaren and the hundreds of friends he made in North America deeply mourning his passing. But although McLaren has died, the team he built, continues and once again were favourites when the 1970 Can-Am Series opened at the Mosport circuit near Toronto. Among the reasons for optimism were the...

Page 86 of August 2000 archive issue thumbnail Page 86, August 2000

Misguided missile

Shadow's first car was one of the strangest devices ever seen on a racetrack. Preston Lerner recounts how innovative ideas on the drawing board became fundamental flaws in the flesh. Picture a car the size of a go-kart. No, a tad bigger. Say knee-high, with tyres that wouldn't look too out of place on a Ford Ka. Now picture a hulk of Detroit iron. No, bigger. A lot bigger. Say seven litres of...

Page 31 of May 1975 archive issue thumbnail Page 31, May 1975

Before We lose Track

Before We Lose Track THE NAME of Shadow is a comparative newcomer to Formula One, these cars being the products of Nichols Advanced Vehicle Systems Inc., the engineering firm run by American Don Nichols. Sponsored by Universal Oil Products the Nichols team came to Europe in 1973, setting up a base in Northampton on the Weedon Road Industrial Estate, employing Tony Southgate (ex-Gurney Eagle and...

Page 50 of April 1973 archive issue thumbnail Page 50, April 1973

7th South African Grand Prix

Controversial Stewart victory KYALAMI, March 3rd. JACKIE STEWART will remember his win in the 1973 South African Grand Prix for a long time. After a frightening crash in practice, following total brake failure on his own machine, he took over team-mate Cevert's Tyrrell but only qualified on the seventh row of the grid. With only seven laps of the race completed the Scot was in the lead and he was...

Page 53 of July 1976 archive issue thumbnail Page 53, July 1976

Notes on the Cars at Monte Carlo

There was nothing startlingly new at Monte Carlo, but quite a lot of detail improvements and modifications to existing cars. However, the Scuderia Ferrari produced a brand new 312T2 car, number 027 in the series, and this was given to Regazzoni. The first of the T2 cars, number 025, was relegated to the role of "muletta" or the team spare. Lauda was still with his usual car, number 026, and as...

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