Articles tagged Gerhard Berger

Page 24 of November 2018 archive issue thumbnail Page 24, November 2018

DTM faces fight for its future

With Mercedes quitting and Audi making threats, a third brand must be found The DTM stands on the cusp of a great new era in which multiple manufacturers from around the world slug it out on the tracks of Europe and perhaps beyond. Or it could be headed for extinction in little more than a season’s time. The German-based touring car series is finally within touching distance of a common rulebook...

Page 19 of December 2014 archive issue thumbnail Page 19, December 2014

Reflections with Nigel Roebuck

The Bianchi accident, Montjuich Park 1975, Vettel and Alonso In the hours following Jules Bianchi’s accident, several moments and conversations came back to me, one of them with Martin Brundle at Suzuka in 1995, in which he recalled the Japanese Grand Prix a year earlier. In appalling conditions – worse even than those at this year’s race – Brundle’s McLaren flew off the road at the Dunlop Curve...

Page 30 of November 2014 archive issue thumbnail Page 30, November 2014

Here comes the son

Racing folk are aware of his existence, but less sure about the precise role Piero Ferrari plays in the globally famous company established by his father Enzo. Would it surprise you to know he’s been its driving force for many a year, despite popular perceptions to the contrary? Read on as he talks to Motor Sport in a world exclusive Photographer: James Mitchell The man in the shadows of a legend...

Page 76 of March 2011 archive issue thumbnail Page 76, March 2011

Lunch with... Alex Wurz

Tall men are not meant to make top racing drivers, yet he had a busy 12-year career as F1 racer and tester. Now his heart is set on a third Le Mans win By Simon Taylor Alex Wurz looks like Hollywood’s idea of a racing driver: alert, clear-eyed, charming yet steely, wiry and very fit. And tall. But, as we know, in real life the most successful racing drivers tend to be little guys. It’s not just...

Page 10 of December 1987 archive issue thumbnail Page 10, December 1987

Some You Win, Some You Lose

I well recall my personal enthusiasm for Niki Lauda who, apart from being a mate, was a driver I always reckoned had everything all weighed up. In 1977, when he won his second World Championship title for Ferrari, I thought he won it by cunning and good judgement. DSJ on the other hand, reckoned he did so by stealth and consistency. In other words, "playing the points game". For the record, Mario...

Page 90 of September 2014 archive issue thumbnail Page 90, September 2014

Growing up the hard way

Motor racing’s nursery floor has been horribly cluttered in recent seasons, but steps are being taken to tidy things up. We take a look at what’s gone wrong, what makes sense and what’s being done… Writer Simon Arron There was once an elegant simplicity. Forty years ago many British race meetings would commence with a couple of Formula Ford heats, sometimes three, to whittle the field down to 30-...

Page 23 of August 2014 archive issue thumbnail Page 23, August 2014

Nigel Roebuck

Returning to Indy, Monaco’s faded glamour, Rosberg’s guile Sometimes,” wrote Henry Manney in Road and Track half a century ago, “I wish I was in Indianapolis. But not often.” Time was when the Indianapolis 500 was always run – whatever the day of the week – on May 30, Memorial Day, and a public holiday in the USA. And time was, too, when virtually the whole of the month of May, which included two...

Page 161 of July 2014 archive issue thumbnail Page 161, July 2014

Holding on for the ride

Power was king, but its generation was often more subtle than the wider world appreciated. Irrespective of methodology, the spectacle was absolute Writer Simon Arron Portugal, 1984. It is early evening and teams are taking part in the recce for round three of the World Rally Championship. For the first time, Juha Kankkunen is being co-driven by Fred Gallagher in one of Toyota Team Europe’s...

Page 25 of July 2014 archive issue thumbnail Page 25, July 2014

Nigel Roebuck

Warring team-mates, matters acoustic, Senna and Ferrari When Jochen Rindt’s Lotus crashed massively at Montjuich in 1969, he was extraordinarily fortunate to escape with relatively light injuries. This was the time of the ludicrous ‘tall’ wings, and the flimsy supports on Rindt’s car simply collapsed, as they had – a few minutes earlier, at the same spot – on the sister car of Graham Hill, the...

Page 16 of November 2008 archive issue thumbnail Page 16, November 2008

Nigel Roebuck

Reflections– Rising star Vettel shows shades of Prost– Spa penalty protest brings no surprises– The legacy left by American champ Phil Hill– Bernie’s tribute to his friend Stuart Lewis-Evans Leaving aside Monaco, where his profile was ultra-low during a brief visit to the paddock, Max Mosley chose Monza, the last European Grand Prix of the season, for a first ‘public appearance’ since his unusual...

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