Articles tagged Lee Guinness

Page 58 of March 1992 archive issue thumbnail Page 58, March 1992

Veteran to Classic

Having, if I may say so, rather a fine collection of sparking plugs, including an igniter from Concorde, I was very interested in the latest book in the Rolls-Royce Heritage Trust's series of publications The Vital Spark! by Keith Gough, who joined KLG in 1950, and became Lodge's Chief Engineer in 1962, retiring in 1982. His little book is about the development of aero-engine plugs but will be of...

Page 140 of December 2010 archive issue thumbnail Page 140, December 2010

Remembered for the wrong thing

The name Brabazon is often associated with an aircraft that no-one bought, but this pioneer had much to boast of Lord Brabazon of Tara was a most remarkable man who had many interests and achieved many firsts in his long life. Born John Moore-Brabazon, at Cambridge he founded the first motor club with Lionel de Rothschild and during the holidays was a mechanic to Charles Rolls who remained a...

Page 153 of June 2014 archive issue thumbnail Page 153, June 2014

From the archives with... Doug Nye

Sydney's opera horse Problems with a 4wd Ferguson trigger memories of bygone engineering complexity Late on the Saturday night at Goodwood’s ‘72’ meeting, I was walking through the paddock when I happened upon a perplexed little group huddled over the fabulous four-wheel-drive Ferguson P99. Owner/driver Stuart Rolt explained that its Climax engine had subsided into silence on his first practice...

Page 122 of September 2014 archive issue thumbnail Page 122, September 2014

Multiple choice

Continuing a trilogy that chronicles key moments in the sport’s technical evolution, we look back at a race featuring the very best from France, Britain, Italy and America Writer Paul Fearnley Post-war emotion was still raw in France and Mercedes was neither welcome nor invited. It wouldn’t have won in any case. Hyperinflation in Germany, when added to that denial of top-rank European competition...

Page 213 of July 2014 archive issue thumbnail Page 213, July 2014

From the archive with... Doug Nye

In Jarrot's slipstream Retracing the route of the Circuit des Ardennes, where British pioneers made their names London’s first Chinese restaurant, it appears, was opened in 1907. Now park that thought for a while. During the same year, Belgium’s last Circuit des Ardennes race took place on a 53½-mile-long public road course based upon the market town of Bastogne. The Circuit des Ardennes was the...

Page 44 of February 2014 archive issue thumbnail Page 44, February 2014

Letters

Memories of Henry Taylor It’s sad that Henry Taylor has died, but I have a good memory of him. In 1968, when the London-Sydney Marathon rally was announced, I was part of the Supersport rally team in Acton. We had an excellent relationship with the Ford Competition Department in Boreham, so I phoned Henry, then Ford’s competition manager, and said “Any chance of a car?” Henry said, “If you get a...

Page 47 of March 1979 archive issue thumbnail Page 47, March 1979

The Editor looks at the legand of the invincible Talbot-Darracos

One of Louis Coatalen's great interests was motor racing and when he became Chief Engineer of the STD organisation he was able to indulge this whim to the full, perhaps at the expense of the share-holders. Naturally, he set his sights on winning the Grand Prix. In 1912 his small cars, based on the standard Sunbeams, had given the bigger cars a fright. In 1913 Coatalen's side-valve GP Sunbeam had...

Page 10 of January 1948 archive issue thumbnail Page 10, January 1948

149 Cars

(In this interesting contribution, G. R. N. Minchin, at our request, describes some of his 149 personal motor-vehicles. - Ed. My present two cars are my 148th and 149th, and let me say that if anyone should think this is a record, it is not, as I know someone who has had 212! In my opinion every real motorist should start with motor-cycles and thereby graduate to cars. A sweeping statement...

Page 19 of November 1933 archive issue thumbnail Page 19, November 1933

GREAT RACING MARQUES

RACING MARQUES GREAT BENTLEY The first car. THE name of Bentley was by no means unknown in the racing world before the first car bearing it ever made its appearance. All followers of the sport in pre-War days remembered " W.O. on his little D.F.P. in the 1914 T.T., and the plucky performance which he put up. When, therefore, directly after the war it became known that he was going to produce a...

Page 105 of May 1997 archive issue thumbnail Page 105, May 1997

Motor-racing Etonians

It was announced a short time back that Eton College is to close its museum of animals, birds and other specimens shot and brought back to England by ex-pupils, because now very few of the boys visit this corner of memories of how some builders of Empire relaxed in their spare moments. The curator was, we heard, open to suggestions for something of wider appeal reflecting recent activities. I...

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