Articles tagged Raymond Sommer

Page 62 of May 1984 archive issue thumbnail Page 62, May 1984

Disappointments...

Personal disappointment relates to not having been sufficiently industrious in youth, to have studied things like workshop practice and simple welding etc, so that I could have worked on my cars and perhaps even built a special, and God not having endowed me with the qualities required for being a top-line racing driver… Thinking in terms of the many disappointments that have involved those who...

Page 116 of July 2014 archive issue thumbnail Page 116, July 2014

Three colours red

Alfa Romeo, Maserati and Ferrari flew the flag for Italy with elegant style – and success. How they did it, so rapidly after the ravages of war, is a remarkable tale grounded in politics and passionWriter Richard Williams Alfa Romeo’s team of cherry-red Tipo 158s took the first three places in the inaugural round of the Formula 1 world championship at Silverstone on May 13, 1950, with Nino Farina...

Page 106 of July 2014 archive issue thumbnail Page 106, July 2014

Cleared for take-off

Necessity rendered this one of the briefest ‘decades’ in the annals of motor sport, yet it would also be one of the most pivotal in Britain as the business found its future directionWriter Simon Arron The world had rather more pressing concerns than a monthly price rise, but that was one of the headlines when the January 1940 issue of Motor Sport reached the shelves of a nation at war. It is...

Page 142 of November 2008 archive issue thumbnail Page 142, November 2008

No more nicknames?

Nicknames seem to have become obsolescent in modern-era motor racing. Perhaps it was the wartime service background of so many past heroes which sparked the nickname habit. Physical traits had their sometimes logical, occasionally ironic, result in the cases of ‘Lofty’ England – towering well over six feet tall – ‘Curly’ Dryden – bald as a coot – or ‘Ciccio’ – more or less ‘Chubby’ – Ascari (...

Page 22 of December 1932 archive issue thumbnail Page 22, December 1932

1932 IN RETROSPECT

1932 IN RETROSPECT. A SUMMARY OF THE YEAR'S ACTIVITIES AND TENDENCIES By HAROLD NOCKOLDS IN spite of conditions of world economic depression motor racing in 1932 has enjoyed a more widespread popularity than in any year since the Great War. Prom the public point of view this can be accounted for to a certain extent by the apparent paradox that the less money people are earning, and the larger the...

Page 42 of September 1991 archive issue thumbnail Page 42, September 1991

Road Test -- BMW 325i

World Class Leader When BMW were faced with replacing the two boxy generations of 3-series that had served from 1975 to 1990, with over 3.5 million sales, they knew their largest volume seller demanded a brand new body. Gone are the upright lines and air of quality that was the envy of the non-Mercedes manufacturing World: in came the aero generation 3-series, plastics to the fore. The result was...

Page 144 of April 2008 archive issue thumbnail Page 144, April 2008

Brits get an icy reception

When the British contingent found a unique way to deal with the arctic conditions of the 1947 Swedish Grand Prix, their rivals cried foul play Odd-ball motor races – unusual events that feature internationally recognised categories of significant racing cars – are always interesting. Perhaps the all-time prize winner might turn out to be the Israel Grand Prix on the so-called Barnea Beach circuit...

Page 87 of December 1983 archive issue thumbnail Page 87, December 1983

Out of the past

An unusual and intriguing correspondence took root in the Daily Telegraph recently. It was started by a Miss E. A. Locke who wrote to say she had held a driving licence for 55 years. This evoked quite a response from other venerable motoring ladies. A Mrs Roche put in a claim on behalf of her grandmother, who has been motoring since June 1911 and still, the letter explained, drives most days at...

Page 98 of December 1998 archive issue thumbnail Page 98, December 1998

BIritish Racing Misery

I read with amusement the editor's comments on how the V16 BRMs lived up to their original failures at the marvellous Goodwood Revival Meeting. Much has been written about Raymond Mays' too ambitious attempt to put Britain on the post-war GP map. Here is how it looked to one who was there at the time. I had seen the splendid performances Raymond Mays had put up before the war in speed-trials,...

Page 40 of July 1933 archive issue thumbnail Page 40, July 1933

THE GRAND PRIX OF NIMES

THE GRAND PRIX F NIMES The Grand Prix of Nimes, although a "round the town" race, is different from such events as the Monaco G.P., the Pau G.P. and the Douglas race. The circuit is composed of two long straights of the Boulevard Jean-Jaures, joined at each end by a hairpin bend. To make the course more severe, both for drivers and machines, some artificial bends, or "chicanes," similar to those...

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