BETTER STREET LIGHTING

Author

admin

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

BETTER STREET LIGHTING

THE steady increase in night traffic emphasises the necessity for adequate and efficient illumination of roads and streets.

The Automobile Association has recently closely investigated street lighting conditions in Greater London. The types of lighting employed include electricity, incandescent gas, high pressure gas (which is practically super-charged incandescent gas) and carbon-arc lighting. All these systems are used in a variety of ways, and the strength of

illumination varies according to candle power, voltage, etc. Different methods of diffusion of light are used ; while some lamps are fixed on standards, others are hung across the roadways.

In cases where lamp posts are staggered, instead of being erected in line on the kerb, the road surface is better lighted, especially in residential streets or roads across commons and open spaces. One London park is lighted by two Authorities. One Authority provides generous illumination, the other does not. Standardisation of street lighting (and

possibly re-arrangement of lighting Authorities’ boundaries) is the obvious remedy, and one which has recently received the close study of the Illumination Bodies of the British Engineering Standards Association.

The A.A., in the interests of road users is always pressing for general improvement in street lighting, and information from members concerning any roads or streets which are adequately illuminated, thereby rendering unnecessary the use of headlamps, will be welcomed by the Association.

Related articles

Related products