Letters From Readers, April 1931

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Letters from Readers.

Invicta Driving Methods.

I would like to make a few comments in regard to a statement on page 21 2 of the March issue of “MOTOR SPORT,” in reference to the 1931 Sports Invicta at the Cambridge Speed Trials at Branches Park.

You state that “this car can do more than 10 m.p.h. on 1st before changing up.” I would like to say that Mr. H. E. Symons, of the “Motor,” informed the that Mr. Healey, of Monte Carlo fame, had practised extensively for acceleration figures on a similar car, and that he proved. that the best possible figures were obtained by just getting the car moving in bottom gear, before changing into second ; this avoids the possibility of extensive wheel spin.

I quite agree that the car was almost new, but might I point out that this car, in its new state and fully equipped, beat the completely stripped 30/98 Vauxhall driven by a very experienced driver. Also, as a matter of interest, the Invicta competing at the hill climb at Oxford against a 36/220 Mercedes, super-charged Amilcars and other hot things, put up the fastest time of the day, the car starting in second and not using bottom at all.

E. J. KgitoE, Racing Manager, Motor Showrooms, Ltd. To save our readers the trouble of referring to the issue of “MOTOR SPORT” in question, we will quote the paragraph referred to in full :—

” A very neat-looking ‘4. ‘ Invicta was entered by Kehoe, but as its driver appeared to regard the event either as a concours d’elegance or a running-in track, the car never had a chance to show its paces. Alter all, this car can do more than 10 m.p.h. in low before changing up.”

It would appear from Mr. Kehoe’s letter that he considers that we are disparaging the Invicta.’ To anyone who reads the above paragraph it will be obvious that nothing is further from the truth. We are fully aware of the magnificent achievements of this marque, and the road test of Mr. Healey’s car in our March issue shows how much we appreciate the qualities of this particular model. The performance of other Invictas in other hands, to which Mr. Kehoe refers, is hardly relevant, as it was his own performance to which we were referring. We do not wish to dispute the methods of driving which he advocates, but we only regret that he was not more successful in their employment. To beat a sports car of similar capacity, of which the design originated nearly

twenty years ago, hardly strikes us as a wonderful feat, and we might mention that at the Ewelme Downs hill climb the following week (referred to by Mr. Kehoe) the same car turned the tables on him once more. We can hardly believe that he is attributing the other car’s performance to it driver’s experience, as we had always imagined that Mr. Kehoe, from his official designation, was himself an experienced driver. The moral of the whole affair seems to come to this—if you are not prepared to go all out in an event of this nature, it is fairer to the car concerned not to run at all.—ED.