CITROENS ON MONTLHERY

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CONTINENTAL NOTES. CITROENS ON MONTLHERY

AS announced in last month’s MOTOR SPORT two longdistance record attempts have . recently been started at Montlhery track.

The first car to start was the 10 h.p. model “la petite Rosalie.” The weather was most inauspicious at the start of the 25,000 kilometre attempt, snow falling heavily. In spite of this an excellent speed was maintained, and at the end of 24 hours a distance of 2,433 kilometres had been covered, at an average speed of roughly 63 m.p.h. The next day, however, the attempt had to be abandoned, for a sharp frost set in, and converted the track into an ice-rink. After some valiant attempts to keep going, in which the drivers showed great skill in skid-correction, it was decided to postpone the run until finer weather returned. A week passed, and the snow and ice all melted, so that once more the tea.m assembled to get under weigh. The drivers were L. Marchand, C. Marchand, L. de Presale, R. Fortin, and M. Combette. No sooner had the attempt started than rain began to fall, but the drivers managed to cope with this new obstruction quite successfully, so that at the end of 24 hours a distance of 2,413 kilo

metres had been covered, being a slight drop on the car’s previous figures. The speed of ” la petite Rosalie” was still high enough to break records, however, and the first to fall was the 4,000 kilometres, at 99.570 k.p.h., followed by the 48 hours at 99,305 k.p.h., the 3,000 miles at 99,331 k.p.h., and the 5,000 kilometres at 99,270 k.p.h., all in International Class F (under 1,500 c.c.). By this time the weather had cleared up, and the drivers had a much easier ta k. The 4,000 miles fell at 99.361 k.p.h., and the 3 days’ record at 99.477 k.p.h. It will be seen that the car was lapping at an extraordinarily consistent pace, there being’ practically no variation in its speed for the whole run so far. Nothing seemed likely to stop the car, and the following day the 5,000 miles record fell at 99.531 k.p.h. and the 4 days at 99.535 k.p.h. All these records had been held by Singer and Fiat. Two more records fell, the 10,000 kilometres at 99.572 k.p.h. and the 5 days at 99.593 k.p.h., when the little car, at 10.30 in the morning, failed to appear at the replenishment depot. The trouble was found to be a broken back axle, which by the rules governing record attempts, could not be

changed. Nothing daunted, those in charge of the run decided to begin all over again, after the repair had been executed.

All this time another Citroen had been circling the track, starting on the 4th March. The same drivers as those piloting” la Petite Rosalie” were used, but in addition Edmond Bestaux and Alphonse Valiant were brought into action. This car, named “Agatha,” was a 20 h.p . model, fitted with a two-seater racing body, and the idea was to attack long distance class, and probably world’s records.

At the end of the first 24 hours a distance of 3,011 kilometres had been covered at an average speed of roughly 78 m.p.h. Maintaining this speed with unfailing regularity ” Agatha ” kept going to such good purpose that the 5,000 miles record fell at a speed of 125 k.p.h. and the 3 days at 124 k.p.h. The next day it was found that the 10,000 kilometres and the 4 days records had been taken, all from the Hotchkiss which holds all the long-distance records in Class “C.” The latest news is that the 15,000 kilometres and 5 days have fallen by the board, and that the car is still going as regularly as ever.

4.9 Bugatti Records at Montlhery.

The Kaye Don Eldridge Eyston 4.9 Bugatti has been greatly modified for this season, the engine being set further back in the frame, and Lockheed brakes being substituted for the original system. It was recently decided to attack records at Montlhery, but the day fixed for the attempt on the Class C 1 hour record produced a severe rain-storm, so that Kaye Don, who was to drive -the car, was forced to put off the attempt. Finally, the weather cleared, and the car set off. The hour record was taken successfully at a speed of 123.01 m.p.h., and all being well, the car pushed on and took the 200 miles record at 122.36 m.p.h., G. E. T. Eyston driving for the last part of

the run. Previously the hour record was held by the ” Tiger ” Sunbeam, also driven by Don, at 120.80 m.p.h., and the 200 miles record at 117.47 by the Delage driven by Don. Needless to say, Dunlop tyres were used.

The Road Racing Season Opens.

The two big events of next month are the Italian 1,000 Miles Race on April 8th and 9th, and the Monaco Grand Prix on April 23rd. For the former the only British entries will be the team of M.G. Magnettes to be driven by Earl Howe, Sir H. Birkin, G. E. T. Eyston, B. Rubin and

H. C. Hamilton. As usual, the preponderance of entrants will drive Alfa Rotneos.

The Monaco Grand Prix is open to competitors by invitation only.

Continental drivers have a habit of entering for races at the last moment, so although we are not in a position to give a complete entry list at the time of writing, the usual first class field will undoubtedly go to the line on the 23rd of next month.

A considerable sensation has been caused by the action of the International Sporting Commission in debarring Fiats from entering in competitions for one year. The trouble all arose in Spain, but the suspension applies to the whole world. So that Fiat owners can compete in International events until the appeal is heard. The Fiat Company, in co-operation with the Italian Automobile Club, has lodged a protest.

A Speedy Renault. Speed demonstrations by standard cars with normal coachwork are always interesting from the sports car owner’s point of view, and seem to be specialised in on the Continent and in the U.S.A. A very striking performance of this nature was recently accomplished by a straighteight Renault, with an occasional four-seater cabriolet body, on the

Linas Montlhery autodrome. Driven by Quartresous the car was officially timed by the Automobile Club de France for 6 consecutive hours, at the end of which the remarkable distance of 925 kilometres 853 metres had been covered, at an average speed of roughly 96 m.p.h., the fastest lap being at the rate of 99 m.p.h.

MOTOR SPORT readers will recall the wonderful 24 hour world’s record held for many years by a 45 h.p. Renault with enclosed cockpit, and it is possible that this recent run is in the nature of a preliminary try-out for serious record work with the straight-eight model. At all events, 96 m.p.h. for six hours with a completely equipped stock car is a wonderful achievement.

For a non-stop run of this nature freedom from tyre trouble is essential, and the Dimlops used on the Renault looked hardly used at the end. of six hours.

The Chateau-Thierry Hill Climb.

The famous French hill climb at Chateau-Thierry will be held this year on April 9th. The organisation is in the hands of the A.C. de Picardie et de l’Aisne, and the event is promoted by the newspaper ” L’Echo des Sports.”

Already several well-known drivers have expressed their intention of taking part in the hill-climb, among them being Raymond Sommer (Maserati) and Giraud Cabanto us (Caban). It will be remembered that last year the fastest car time was made by Druck on a 2 litre Bugatti, at an average speed of 63.5 m.p.h.

Good News of the Bol d’Or.

The annual 24 hours race run on the circuit at St. Germain, near Paris, at Whitsuntide always attracts a good entry and a large attendance. This year the event has

received the blessing of the Federation Nationale des Clubs Automobiles de France, and at recent meeting of the Council it was decided to provide an. annual cash prize of 10,000 francs to the race. This sum will be awarded to the car covering the greatest distance in the 24 hours of the race, a ” car ” being designated a vehicle with four wheels. The race is open to three-wheelers, and the Bol d’Or is awarded to the competitor who travels the greatest mileage, either on three wheels or four. The race never seems to attract British competitors, although we imagine that a Montlhery

Midget or a Riley Nine would stand a very good chance of success. The race is a considerable test of endurance, for only one driver per car is allowed, and in addition, the 2f mile circuit abounds in corners. An English driver would have the extra inducement of attempting to win the coveted Robert Senechal Cup, awarded to the driver who holds the record for the 24 hours race. So far the cup has never been awarded, for Robert Senechal himself still holds the record of 1,205.32 miles established in 1926.

Any British driver who is thinking of entering should get in touch with Mon. E. Mame, 87, Boulevard de Rheims, Paris (17e).

Who wants a Bugatti ?

Double-camshaft 2.3 litre Bugattis are not easily come by in the second-hand market, especially one that has a successful racing season to its credit. In France, however, there is a car of this description awaiting a purchaser, to wit, the Bugatti raced by Rene Dreyfus last year. Now it is the property of M. Tremblay, of Nice, who entered the car in the Pau Grand Prix, where it was driven by Morand. M. Tremblay now wishes to dispose of the car. Any offers ?

A ” Stable ” to be reckoned with.

In spite of the lack of team entries by manufacturers there is no falling off in the entry lists of forthcoming races. This fact is largely due to the new ” entrant ” in motor-racing, namely, the “stable.” Starting

with the Ferrari group in Italy, with. Nuvolari and Borzacchini as drivers, among others, the next to be formed was the Sommer/Zehender team. This was followed by the Birkin/ Rubin combination in this country, and now comes the great news that Louis Chiron, the French champion about whose plans there have been so many conflicting rumours, has joined forces with the German driver Rudolf Caracciola.

According to the Parisien newspaper ” L’Auto,” these two redoubtable drivers will be seen throughout the season at the wheel of Bugatti and Alfa Romeo racing cars. Already they have at their disposal a couple of 2.3 doublecamshaft Bugattis, a model for which Chiron has a particular affection, and in addition they have placed an order for two of the latest type 2.3 litre Alfa Romeos, which will be used for “sports car” races at Le Mans and Spa—and, one hopes, at Ulster. The Ferrari stable will have to look to its laurels I

The Grand Prix of Tunis.

Unforttmately, the results of the Grand Prix of Tunis arrived in London too late for inclusion in this issue of MOTOR SPORT. The race took place on March 26th over the circuit of Carthage, which measures 12 kilometres 714 metres, and competitors had to cover 37 laps, or a total distance of 470 kilometres 418 metres. The prize money subscribed for the race was considerable ; the winner receiving 40,000 francs ; second man 25,000 francs ; third, 15,000 francs ; fourth, 8,000 francs ; and fifth, 5,000 francs.

At the time of going to press the entry list was as follows : Hartmann (Bugatti), Petsche (Alfa Romeo), Lehoux (Bugatti), Etancelin (Alfa Romeo), Falchetto (Bugatti), Czaikowski (Bugatti), Sommer (Maserati), Gaupillat (Bugatti), Toselli (Bugatti), Nuvolari (Alfa Romeo), Trintignant (Bugatti), Varzi (Bugatti), Fagioli (Maserati), Borzacchini (Alfa Romeo), Zehender (Maserati), Villar (Alfa Romeo), Walthausen (Alfa Romeo), Braillard (Bugatti), Brunet (Bugatti), Joly (Bugatti), Veyron (Bugatti), and Premoli (Maserati).

The Fiat Affair.

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