EDITORIAL VIEWS, April 1934

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EDITORIAL VIEWS

THE R.A.C. Rally, if it did not prove anything else, did at least show the enormous enthusiasm that motor sport arouses in this country. Even though so many of the entrants were of a “professional ” character, this does not alter the fact, for the trade contingent were using the Rally to advertise the merits of their cars in competition—a certain sales point with the general public. * * * * * It seems a pity that this enthusiasm on the part of

the public cannot find a road-racing outlet. A wonderful season is about to begin on the Continent, but England will still lack a real Grand Prix. For many reasons Brooklands fails to attract foreign entries of importance, and English manufacturers will certainly not build G.P. racing cars until they have a home course for experimental work. * * * * * Meanwhile the efforts of those who are trying to construct a road circuit in England receive scant encourage

ment. Rather does it take the form of opposition. The Brighton scheme has suffered particularly severely in this way, and the worthy citizens (at least some of them) have suddenly become conscious of the beauty of the derelict downs near Portslade. * * *

There is no news of the Gopsall Park proposal, but the superb circuit planned at Ivinghoe is still likely to become a reality. Not the least remarkable feature of all these schemes has been the lack of assistance forthcoming from motor racing personages whose names are household

words. Their actual contributions towards British prestige are very different from what one would expect after bearing their speeches at Club dinners and public functions.

The system of measuring racing tracks such as Montihery by taking a line in the centre will have to receive some revision. The path taken by G. E. T. Eyston’s Panhard et Levassor, for example, at the top of the banking, results in a greater distance being covered than is actually recorded. The Avus roadway, in spite of its sharp unbanked corners at each end, gives a more accurate and more easily obtainable record of a car’s progress.

Unless the line is moved nearer the top of the banking, for high speed records, Montlhery will lose its popularity. The result of the Coppa d’oro della Duce will be a

matter of great interest. To race for 4,000 miles round the varied roads of Italy and Sicily with standard cars is going to reveal the true worth of the competing vehicles. Smooth, straight autostradas will be just as likely to wreck engines as the rough mountain passes will be to break springs, chassis and coachwork.

Truly may the manufacturer be proud of any car which completes the Coppa d’oro della Duce course and finishes in a good position. Every facility is being given to British competitors, and we should like to see a large entry of our many sports models.

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