VINTAGE CARS

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VINTAGE CARS

Sir,

In reply to ” Countryman’s ” letter in the March issue, I enclose herewith two photographs of my 2-litre Sunbeam.

I acquired this car in late 1036, so that the old warrior glories in an up-to-date number CHX 882. This one is chassis No. 3. I have heard at various times of Nos. I and 2 being in places as far apart as Dublin and New Zealand. But No. 3 is definitely in Whetstone. If a description by one imbued more with enthusiasm than technical knowledge would be of any use, I am prepared to make the effort. But, if ” Countryman” is in the same category of enthusiast as I, he would probably be more enthusiastic about my personal experiences with it than with a bare technical

description. Tragedy entered my life the day after buying it, when my wife-tobe and I pushed it up and down the concrete trying to get it to start. At the end of the hardest day’s work I have ever done in two hours, I had to sit down because of the black things that floated before my eyes. Twenty minutes later Tragedy departed. In spite of the vendor’s grim warnings, I decided to risk the handle even if I was crippled for the rest of my life. It went off with half a swing.

Such incidents were common for the first few weeks of my ownership— presumably fear of the ” unknown.” I soon discovered, however, that this old racing-car was nothing more than a really high-class motor car which could be relied upon to run “like a clock.” I am, Yours etc.,

J. TEGRYD JONES. Whetstone,

N.20.

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