Vintage Postbag, continued, April 1961

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That Protos

Sir,

The other day I was fortunate enough to meet the 1920 Protos which Mr. Georgano mentioned in his letter in the December 1960 issue.

The owner was really delighted to hear that his vehicle had been mentioned in the British motoring Press! The present van body is not original, but a similar body was originally fitted. The specification seems to correspond to that given by Dr. Ing. Smekal in the same issue. The engine is a very silent four cylinder of “about 3-litres”—the owner wasn’t sure. Other items include artillery wheels, no front brakes, ½-elliptics all round, right-hand drive, centre accelerator, on outside handbrake in the best tradition, and an equally pleasing right-hand gate change.

The Owner cruises at 45 k.p.h. and claims a top speed of just over 50 k.p.h. (i.e., about 31-32 m.p.h.). The petrol consumption is heavy, being 2.5 litres/100 km., which I make to be exactly 10 m.p.g. The radiator, slightly V-shaped, would be very handsome but for a largish dent at the “Protos” name-plate. A new ring of teeth has been shrunk onto the flywheel at some time, and another one is due any time now. Apart from that, and the trouble experienced in getting new plugs, the vehicle is apparently entirely practicable and a good deal less troublesome than many vehicles one-fortieth of its age. I am, Yours, etc., John S. Mills. Vienna.