Inaccurate Speedometers

Author

admin

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Current page

53

Current page

54

Current page

55

Current page

56

Current page

57

Current page

58

Current page

59

Current page

60

Current page

61

Current page

62

Current page

63

Current page

64

Current page

65

Current page

66

Current page

67

Current page

68

Current page

69

Current page

70

Current page

71

Current page

72

Current page

73

Current page

74

Current page

75

Current page

76

Current page

77

Current page

78

Current page

79

Current page

80

Current page

81

Current page

82

Current page

83

Current page

84

Current page

85

Current page

86

Current page

87

Current page

88

Current page

89

Current page

90

Current page

91

Current page

92

Current page

93

Current page

94

Current page

95

Current page

96

Current page

97

Current page

98

Current page

99

Current page

100

Sir,

I have read with interest your account of a visit to Smith’s speedometer factory, entitled “How Fast.” You referred to the happy workers making precision instruments to an extremely high standard, and wearing overalls of varying colours. I am prepared to accept the happiness of the workers and the colour of their overalls, but as to the precision of their instruments I am somewhat more doubtful.

I have recently become the fortunate owner of a Jaguar XK150 (a really splendid car once its somewhat ephemeral shock absorbers are replaced by Koni’s, and one which is giving me the utmost satisfaction and enjoyment) which is of course fitted with Smith’s instruments. As delivered it read 120 m.p.h. at an indicated 100 m.p.h. by the rev.-counter. I sent it back for adjustment. The car was returned ostensibly with a new speedometer—at any rate the mileage indicator read zero. It still read 120 m.p.h. at 100. I sent it back again. This time it came back reading only 116 at 100. I sent it back again. It was then returned with a letter from Smith’s stating that the instruments “were found to he within the limits laid down by our engineers and the Jaguar Car Company.” They therefore had “no option but to refit the instruments.” Despite this I was amused to note that the speedometer now read only 110 at 100 by the rev.-counter; in fact the limits laid down by Jaguar are 2½% for the rev.-counter at about 4,000 r,p.m. and 5% for the speedometer. Therefore, assuming the rev.-counter is slow by the maximum permitted and the speedometer is fast by the maximum permitted, and that increased radius of the tyres at 100 m.p.h. may account for as much as 3%, I have now, after three attempts, got a speedometer which may, possibly, be just within the maximum limits of inaccuracy laid down by the makers.

Evidently, therefore, it is not always the wicked motor manufacturer demanding “flatter” from Smith’s. So far as I am concerned, I am not in the slightest degree impressed.

I am, Yours, etc.,  Cecil Clutton. Westminster.