Building a Lotus

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Current page

53

Current page

54

Current page

55

Current page

56

Current page

57

Current page

58

Current page

59

Current page

60

Current page

61

Current page

62

Current page

63

Current page

64

Current page

65

Current page

66

Current page

67

Current page

68

Current page

69

Current page

70

Current page

71

Current page

72

Current page

73

Current page

74

Current page

75

Current page

76

Current page

77

Current page

78

Current page

79

Current page

80

Current page

81

Current page

82

Current page

83

Current page

84

Current page

85

Current page

86

Current page

87

Sir,

I read with interest your article on building and running a Lotus Super Seven and having just undertaken a similar piece of lunacy myself I should like to add to your very cogent comments.

My first serious trouble was missing pieces—when the kit arrived from the factory the following were listed as missing: (1) gear-lever adaptor plate, (2) angled water hose, (3) fan blades, (4) steering steadying bracket, (5) gear-lever boot. These were in addition to the hood, sidescreens and tonneau cover which I knew in advance would be late arriving.

When I came to the actual assembly I also found that the following were missing: (1) mushroom-headed bolts for rear radius arms, (2) rubber Rawlnuts for wings, (3) nuts and bolts for wings, (4) nuts and bolts for wing stay clamps, (5) cleavis pins for master cylinder, (6) metal sleeves for rear wing stay, (7) overflow pipe. In addition the back axle leaked oil, the nose cowl had to be cut to fit, the centre section was out of shape and the silencer wouldn’t fit the holes in the body sides.

As an extra bonus I was supplied with the following spares: (1) speedometer right-angle drive, (2) central mounting bracket, (3) fan mounting bracket. Later I also received a set of tapered bolts for the back axle, a pair of short brake hose and a set of instructions on how to fit the sidescreens—a week after I had fitted them by guess-work. I must have spent many pennies on telephoning the factory, but in fairness to Lotus I must say that they never once questioned my word that a part was missing—I’m sure they would have sent another engine if I had said that was missing—and mine Was one of the earliest of the 1500 models.

Unlike yourselves I’ve had no running troubles other than A hard-to-find electrical fault which causes a partial cut-out at about 6,000 r.p.m., and I would forgive Colin Chapman almost anything in exchange for the car’s almost unbelievable acceleration and handling.

Oh, I almost forgot—it overheated in traffic until I enlarged the cooling capacity by about 3 pints (I’ll sell the design to anyone).

T. J. MARTIN.

London, S.W.4.

Related articles

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consetetur sadipscing elitr, sed diam nonumy eirmod tempor invidunt ut labore et dolore

Related products

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consetetur sadipscing elitr, sed diam nonumy eirmod tempor invidunt ut labore et dolore