Period publicity

Author

Bill Boddy

View profile
Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Current page

53

Current page

54

Current page

55

Current page

56

Current page

57

Current page

58

Current page

59

Current page

60

Current page

61

Current page

62

Current page

63

Current page

64

Current page

65

Current page

66

Current page

67

Current page

68

Current page

69

Current page

70

Current page

71

Current page

72

Current page

73

Current page

74

Current page

75

Current page

76

Current page

77

Current page

78

Current page

79

Current page

80

Current page

81

Current page

82

Current page

83

Current page

84

Current page

85

Current page

86

Current page

87

Current page

88

Current page

89

Current page

90

Current page

91

Current page

92

Current page

93

Current page

94

Current page

95

Current page

96

Current page

97

Current page

98

Current page

99

Current page

100

Current page

101

Current page

102

Current page

103

Current page

104

Current page

105

Current page

106

Current page

107

Current page

108

Current page

109

Current page

110

Current page

111

Current page

112

Current page

113

Current page

114

Current page

115

Current page

116

Current page

117

Current page

118

Current page

119

Current page

120

Current page

121

Current page

122

Current page

123

Current page

124

Two of the more prized booklets in my collection of old motor car catalogues are those issued by the Austin Motor Co. Ltd. of Longbridge, Birmingham and by Leyland Motors Ltd. of Kingston-on-Thames, at a time when both these Industrial giants were making economy cars for the new band of motorists that had emerged after the war. Having referred to these little publicity items last month, I felt I must take another look at them. 

The Austin Seven booklet is called “The Motor for the Millions”. It runs to 20 7½” x 5″ pages not counting the covers and on its front cover has a colour photograph of a lady loading her golf-bag into the space behind the front seats of a very early Chummy. The 10½ b.h.p. Austin 7 cost £165 “at works”, and workmanship and materials were described simply as “Austin quality”. There was no mention of a self-starter. Special insurance was available for £8 10/- (£8.50) a year.

That this advertising booklet was aimed at those new to the delights of motoring is obvious, for it speaks of the vastly widened interest ownership of an Austin 7 would bring, which could not be measured in terms of money — “fresh air, new scenes and an interest”. After telling of running one for one penny a mile, it was suggested that in many cases the purchase price could show a profit. Although the text of this book is divided into that directed at women drivers and commercial travellers, the bias was towards the lady motorist, seven out of ten photographs showing a girl either driving or with her Seven, the car used for most of the shots being OK 3537 although in one of them two Chummies are depicted. There is a semi-fictitious story from the Grimsby Daily Telegraph called “The Conversion Of Jinks”, praising the Seven; two pages are devoted to competition successes in races and trials, with a paragraph about being “Victor of Italian Grand Prix”, and two pages to testimonials, some from the Press, an owner writing of averages of over 23 m.p.h. from Liverpool to Birkenhead, at 52 m.p.g. This must be about the earliest piece of Austin Seven advertising — the book’s back cover shows a Chummy, hood up, driving into the night, past a drawn-in fir tree, but the artist has flooded the road with light that is clearly not coming from the scuttle-mounted headlamps! It is claimed in the business section that there were agents all over the World but only the one in Brussels is given. . . . 

The Trojan booklet is called “Side Lights” and tuns to 15 slightly smaller pages. The cover carries an artist’s colour impression by Roland Turner of a solid-tyred Trojan tourer coming down a leafy lane with its headlamps on — mounted in this case on top of the front mudguards. Thirteen real photographs illustrate the inside pages and the book is sub-divided into imagined testimonials written respectively by The Doctor, The Daughter of the House, The Business Man, The Vicar, The Bachelor (who travelled, with his brother it says, the off-duty driver sleeping in the back of the Trojan “Wagon-lit”), and another section is devoted to The Family Holiday — all written, one guesses, by the same person. The Trojans photographed include PH 6829, PC 7195, DA 739 and TB 675, all solid-tyred tourers, and the car’s many virtues are expounded, like the ease of driving, no flat tyres, seat-starting, the enclosed rear lamp, washing it by leaving it out in the rain, there being no plated parts, the supple springing, etc., and the estate-owner was supposed to have saved his farm by fighting a fire with a Leyland Portable Pump towed behind his Trojan! Again, the “penny-a-mile” theme is there, and Leyland outdid Austin by listing 28 British agents, and enclosing a post-card (½p stamp) with which to apply for a trial run.

Both these publicity booklets seem to have been issued around 1922/23 and one probably inspired the other, but I wonder which appeared first? — W.B.

Related articles

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consetetur sadipscing elitr, sed diam nonumy eirmod tempor invidunt ut labore et dolore

Related products

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consetetur sadipscing elitr, sed diam nonumy eirmod tempor invidunt ut labore et dolore