Veteran to classic -- Ferrari 375 Plus

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Current page

53

Current page

54

Current page

55

Current page

56

Current page

57

Current page

58

Current page

59

Current page

60

Current page

61

Current page

62

Current page

63

Current page

64

Current page

65

Current page

66

Current page

67

Current page

68

Current page

69

Current page

70

Current page

71

Current page

72

Current page

73

Current page

74

Current page

75

Current page

76

Current page

77

Current page

78

Current page

79

Current page

80

Current page

81

Current page

82

Current page

83

Current page

84

Current page

85

Current page

86

Current page

87

Current page

88

Current page

89

Current page

90

Current page

91

Current page

92

Current page

93

Current page

94

Current page

95

Current page

96

Current page

97

Current page

98

Current page

99

Current page

100

Current page

101

Current page

102

Current page

103

Current page

104

Current page

105

Current page

106

Current page

107

Current page

108

Ferrari Follow up

Following our story of the Ferrari 375 Plus in the January issue, Mr Fred Hislop has written to us with information on chassis 0392AM, the car which Louis Rosier and Robert Manzon drove at Le Mans in 1954 and which subsequently won the Carrera Panamericana. After that success it was acquired by Erwin Goldschmidt of New York who campaigned it in various events in the United States.

At this time motor racing was still in its infancy in many countries, and the European style had yet to be accepted everywhere, particularly across the Atlantic where “banger”, or stock car, racing still ruled supreme.

Canada very much followed this tradition, but of its two motor racing venues, it was Toronto which was readier to embrace other forms of racing than the more conservative Montreal circuit. Consequently it was the Sports Car Club of Toronto, namely Fred Hislop who at the time lived there, who can claim the credit for Ferrari’s first race on Canadian soil.

It was his victory in the Giant’s Despair hilIclimb in Pennsylvania which brought Goldschmidt to Hislop’s attention and the invitation for the American to come North and race in the Toronto club’s One Hour Handicap Race. The disused airfield at Edenvale, some 60 miles north of Toronto, was hardly an enticing venue, but the prospect of a packed race of 40 assorted cars, including some rapid lightweight XK120s amongst them, was fortunately mouthwatering enough.

Overcoming a little local difficulty at Niagara, where Customs had to be assured that this crazy American and his strange European car were just entering the country to go motor racing, Erwin Goldschmidt and his entourage arrived in force.

Their presence was immediately noted, not only by fellow competitors who marvelled at the car and its prodigious speed, but also by the local police who kept a weather eye out for it and the antics of its driver to and from the circuit.

Fortunately there were not any ugly incidents either on or off the track and Goldschmidt started the race from pole position. Needless to say he won the event by a country mile, enthusiasm for the American and his machine almost reaching fever pitch among the 5000 strong crowd as he reeled in and passed backmarker after backmarker. The prize was not great, and the prestige negligible, but a small piece of history had been made that day.

The car was subsequently raced in Nassau later in the year, had a few more races in the States in 1956, and then was sold through Luigi Chinetti, who was present at the race in Canada, to one William Carpenter. The car now resides in Australia where it has been restored by Brian Wiesner.— WPK