Reviews, April 2017

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Current page

53

Current page

54

Current page

55

Current page

56

Current page

57

Current page

58

Current page

59

Current page

60

Current page

61

Current page

62

Current page

63

Current page

64

Current page

65

Current page

66

Current page

67

Current page

68

Current page

69

Current page

70

Current page

71

Current page

72

Current page

73

Current page

74

Current page

75

Current page

76

Current page

77

Current page

78

Current page

79

Current page

80

Current page

81

Current page

82

Current page

83

Current page

84

Current page

85

Current page

86

Current page

87

Current page

88

Current page

89

Current page

90

Current page

91

Current page

92

Current page

93

Current page

94

Current page

95

Current page

96

Current page

97

Current page

98

Current page

99

Current page

100

Current page

101

Current page

102

Current page

103

Current page

104

Current page

105

Current page

106

Current page

107

Current page

108

Current page

109

Current page

110

Current page

111

Current page

112

Current page

113

Current page

114

Current page

115

Current page

116

Current page

117

Current page

118

Current page

119

Current page

120

Current page

121

Current page

122

Current page

123

Current page

124

Current page

125

Current page

126

Current page

127

Current page

128

Current page

129

Current page

130

Current page

131

Current page

132

Current page

133

Current page

134

Current page

135

Current page

136

Current page

137

Current page

138

Current page

139

Current page

140

Current page

141

Current page

142

Current page

143

Current page

144

Current page

145

Current page

146

Current page

147

Current page

148

Current page

149

Current page

150

Current page

151

Current page

152

Current page

153

Current page

154

Current page

155

Current page

156

Current page

157

Current page

158

Current page

159

Current page

160

Current page

161

Current page

162

Current page

163

Current page

164

Current page

165

Current page

166

Current page

167

Current page

168

Current page

169

Current page

170

Current page

171

Current page

172

Current page

173

Current page

174

Current page

175

Current page

176

Current page

177

Current page

178

Current page

179

Current page

180

Current page

181

Current page

182

Current page

183

Current page

184

Current page

185

Current page

186

Current page

187

Current page

188

Current page

189

Current page

190

Current page

191

Current page

192

Current page

193

Current page

194

Current page

195

Current page

196

Current page

197

Current page

198

Ferrari 70 Years

Dennis Adler

Few words excite the imagination quite like ‘Ferrari’. Undoubtedly the world’s most iconic car manufacturer, Ferrari has transcended itself to become a symbol of desirability and excellence. Its seven-decade evolution has been so widely told that the challenge of producing yet another book worthy of a place on an enthusiast’s bookshelf is daunting. But Ferrari 70 years has achieved that.

In a fascinating insight into an intriguing history, Dennis Adler stylishly presents the full history of Ferrari, from the infamous partnership between Enzo and Luigi Chinetti, to the tragic back story of the Dino and the fascinating origins of the iconic prancing horse. Stunning modern photography and historic imagery encapsulates the full evolution of Ferrari styling, from the minimal AAC 815 to the grandeur of the Enzo.

Ferrari 70 years is a celebration of a motoring legend, well worth the time and money of any Ferrari enthusiast. And most of us are one of those, aren’t we? MT

Published by Motorbooks

ISBN: 978-0-76035189-5, £24.99

Whatever Happened to the Gold Cup?

Mike Allen

I’m not sure there’s such a thing as stealth publishing, but this could be the domain’s foundation stone. Many people will associate ‘Gold Cup’ with singular horsepower and Cheltenham, but the trophy in question here is the one handed out at Oulton Park to such as Stirling Moss, Jim Clark, Jack Brabham, John Surtees and Jackie Stewart. It’s just that the cover doesn’t mention as much…

Self-published by Mike Allen, this focuses on a very specific period in Gold Cup history – 1957-1974, when the event was organised by the Mid-Cheshire Motor Racing Club. This encompasses the greatest phase in the event’s history, when it was usually a non-championship F1 race contested by many of the world’s best.

When early retirement was forced upon him, Allen used the time at his disposal to research the history of a race he’d attended many times as a lad. The results are thorough, with an appraisal of the main event plus details of the support races and fragments of contemporary context thrown in from time to time. Consider this from the programme in 1965, when Formula 2 was the star attraction: “Cars must be equipped with fastening points for a safety harness, though the harness itself is optional”. No mention there of cockpit halos…

It is well illustrated, with black-and-white images from mainstream suppliers such as Getty and LAT, but also a wealth of material from gifted local photographers who deserve to be better known than perhaps they are. The only downside is that the pictures are generally too small – there are some wonderfully candid shots, but self-publishing can impose limitations on both design and pagination.

It matters not.

This might have limited appeal, but it is a charming snapshot borne of genuine passion. SA   

Published by the author, available via Facebook

ISBN: 978-1-5136-1779-4, £30 +p&p

BMC Competitions Department Secrets

Marcus Chambers, Stuart Turner,
Peter Browning

A reprint, perhaps, but this softback contains lots of material for those interested in what rallying (and some racing) was like in the 1950s and ’60s. Laid out around official BMC documents, letters and telegrams, it tells the inside story of BMC’s initially scattergun efforts to get publicity for Riley, Austin, Morris and MG, and how the big prizes came with Healey and Mini once the competitions department was allowed to focus its efforts. There’s relatively little text slotted in between the documents and photos, but the co-authors have all been BMC’s competition managers so it’s cogent stuff.

Hardly a handsome production, with black and white reproduction of variable quality, yet photos of A40s in the Alps, bleary drivers at night controls on the gruelling Liège-Sofia-Liège rally and Morris 1800 Landcrabs on the East African Safari add huge atmosphere. GC

Published by Veloce 

ISBN: 978-1-845849-94-8, £24.99

Caithness to the Côte d’Azur

David Whyte

It must have been dispiriting for a 1930s Monte Carlo Rally entrant who lived in Kent to know he had to drive to John O’Groats even to start the event. Yet as this little work describes, between 1926 and 1939 some 200 crews made that northward slog before heading out for Monte Carlo, because every mile counted for points.

Whyte outlines the trials faced in early days over those tough Caithness roads, sometimes worse than anything in the Alps. He begins in 1926, when Victor Bruce became the first British winner, and includes chapters on lady entrants, racing drivers, toffs and amateurs, and the concours de confort that once mattered so much, especially if you didn’t have much hope of overall victory.

Maybe because I know those roads well the many adventures in this one absorbed me, but I accept it’s the epitome of niche… Mind you, the feat that impressed me most was the lorry driver who in 1934 carried UK competitors’ luggage single-handed from London to Monaco in a Thorneycroft lorry, barely stopping for 48 hours – average speed 18mph. GC

Available from www.srbooks.com, £12 inc P&P

ISBN 978-0-9935971-3-8

Green Hell

Hannes M. Schalle/Moonlake Entertainment

In its 90th year, the Nürburgring’s story is comprehensively told in Moonlake Entertainment’s Green Hell by means of some of Germany’s and the sport’s biggest names. Jochen Mass and Hans Herrmann are just two wheeled out inside the first five minutes, with Murray Walker sharing commentary duty with David Croft. Despite the incredible subject matter it’s a slow burner at first, but spiked with genuinely remarkable period footage showing thousands lining the roadside in the track’s 1930s pomp.

Given the span of time things will inevitably be missed: passing references only to Fangio’s ’57 win, say, and in fairness you wonder how much footage remains usable 60 years on. Jackie Stewart appears frequently, leading to a slightly unnecessary and uncomfortable featurette on the venue’s deadly side. It’s questionable whether extended clips of Le Mans ’55 or Wolfgang von Trips’ death at Monza bring anything to the documentary.

It’s made by the team behind Lauda: The untold story, so they know their Nürburgring, but Green Hell fails to fully convey the ‘Ring’s majesty and ferocity, and isn’t as dynamic as it might have been. At its close it fades into infomercial territory by focusing on the thing keeping the ’Ring open: trackdays. And when JYS reappears to conclude things you’re reminded of the real story that was being told 15 minutes before. If that first hour or so is certainly a worthwhile watch for the stories and period footage, few would blame you for switching off before the end. JP

www.thegreenhellmovie.com

DVD release date TBA