HERE AND THERE, August 1933

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HERE AND THERE

Brooklands Flarescreens.

Nowadays practically every sports car is fitted with a windscreen which can be folded flat. Pleasant and exhilarating as the rush of unimpeded air undoubtedly is, at speeds of over 60 m.p.h. some form of protection is necessary.

It is for this purpose that Frank Ashby & Sons, Ltd., Stirchley, Birmingham, have recently added to their extensive range of ” Brooklands ” equipment for sports cars an accessory known as the ” Flarescreen.” Its design is simplicity itself, for it consists of two sockets, which are permanently fixed to the scuttle, and into which can be fitted the screen itself, a piece of non-inflammable and non-discolouring material known as Bexoid, rimmed with a thin chromium-plated frame. When not required the screen can easily be carried in door pocket or cubbyhole.

The Flarescreen has practically no effect of spoiling stream-lining, and provides adequate protection from insects, dust, and excessive wind-rush so that really high speeds can be indulged in with safety and comfort.

The price is 12s. 6d. each, and the make of car and type of body should be specified When ordering.

Guaranteed Stop-Watches.

No follower of motor sport, whether he be racing motorist, trials driver or keen spectator, can afford to be without a really accurate stop-watch. The occasions on which he will need this instrument are innumerable ; timing lap speeds ; checking acceleration figures for stop and restart tests ; timing pit work practice ; gauging the relative positions of two cars in a race ; and so on. For accurate, guaranteed stop-watches one cannot do better than to visit the premises of Messrs. Arnold & Co., at 122, St. John Street, Clerkenwell, E.C.1, where a full range of watches at varying prices can be inspected. The model which should have a particular appeal to sports motorists is the Arnold independent flyback stop watch, registering 1/5th seconds, finished in a durable oxydised gun

metal case, costing 45/-. This watch is guaranteed for 5 years, and we can personally testify to its long wearing capabilities and accuracy.

Cheaper models are also available, all of them guaranteed, one we saw priced at 25/being a well-finished and attractive piece of work. Normal wrist watches, with a third hand registering 1/5th seconds can be bought for 15/-, while we also examined a 30 hour pocket watch, with a centre registration to 1/5th second, which could be obtained for 10/6.

Lubrication for Self-Changing Gear Boxes.

Messrs. Edward Joy & Sons, Ltd., manufacturers of the well known Filtrate Sports Oil which is in great favour with owners of fast cars, have had on the market for some time a special lubricant for self-changing gear boxes. E. R. Hall used this oil in his M.G. Magnette for the Mannin Beg Race, together with Petroyle Upper Cylinder Lubricant and Filtrate Rear Axle Compound, and reported very satisfactory results in practice and during the race until the time he unfortunately damaged his front axle.

Assisting Small-engine lubrication.

Small engines running at high speed are very often prone to a rather high oil temperature—especially in hot weather—a fault which can easily be remedied by fitting a large capacity sump.

Such an accessory has been placed on the market by M. A. McEvoy (London) Ltd., of Lea.per Street, Derby. Still further to assist cooling, the sump is constructed of an alloy having high heat conductivity, and is heavily ribbed. Two types are so far ready, a Morris Minor sump at 55/and a model for Wolseley Hornets at 65/-. Shortly, owners of 8 h.p. Fords will also be able to obtain the accessory, and other makes will also be catered for.

A New Supercharger.

We recently had an opportunity of inspecting a new Roots-type Supercharger, which has been brought to a production stage by J. W. Marshall, of 22, Pembridge Crescent, 9a, Pembridge Mews, London, W.11.

The range of sizes available is from 750 c.c. to 2,000 c.c. Provision has been made to enable the blower to be driven faster or slower than engine speed, it being possible to gear it up or down. The hollow steel rotors are mounted on Hoffman bearings and can run safely up to 10,000 r.p.m. The casing is made of elektron, and the accumulation of oil in the chamber has been effectively prevented.

As regards pressure, the 1,100 c.c. model, for example, is designed to blow at 10 to 12 lbs. per sq. in. normally, but this can be increased by suitable gearing to 18 lbs. per sq. in. A useful feature, not always possible with superchargers fitted on the nose of the crankshaft, is that provision has been made for the starting handle. A small additional oilpump can be fitted if required.

For J.2 Midget and Magna Owners.

The advantages of carrying two spare wheels will be readily admitted by all motorists who are in the habit of making long journeys with their cars. More particularly, the trials driver will benefit to a great extent by having two spares, on which he can fit competition tyres, and change over the rear wheels when he gets to the trial itself. On large cars it is generally a” fairly easy matter to arrange for an extra spare, but small sports cars present a different This sketch illustrates the working of the C.M.I. Spare Wheel Carrier for M.G. Midgets and

Magnas.

proposition. Owners of M.G. Midget J.2 models and M.G. Magnas fitted with a similar body, can now obtain a very neat extension for the existing carrier at the rear of the petrol tank.

The C.M.I. Spare Wheel Carrier is manufactured by the Central Motor Institute, Pinchley Road, Hampstead, London, N.W.3, and is composed of three spring steel double clips which fit tightly over the spare wheels. The actual process of clamping the wheels in a solid position is accomplished by means of a rubber-handled lever which operates a device of cam-slots engaging with a pin in the spindle of a boss, which passes through the centre of the second wheel. In this way a dust cover is fitted closely to the wheel hub, and at the same time the two wheels are securely fastened.

The carrier can be supplied in any colour, at a price of £2 2s., while for those who prefer some chromium plating about their accessories, a ” de luxe” model is available at £2 15s., with the top clip and operating lever so finished.

A Convincing 011-test.

The R.A.C. has now issued its report on the trial of Castrol XL oil, carried out on a Hillman “Minx.” The purpose of the test was to demonstrate engine-oil consumption, and the figures obtained were truly remarkable. The average speed of the car, excluding all stops, was 26.9 m.p.h. and the route followed was London, Land’s End, Bristol, Birmingham, Manchester, Glasgow, Inverness, John o’ Groats, Aberdeen, Edinburgh, Leeds, Peterborough, and so back to London. Normal fuel was used, and over the whole distance of 2,372 miles the oil consumption worked out at 2,480 m.p.g.

Verb. Sap!

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