YOUR LAST CHANCE TO WIN THE L23 JOHNSON MOTOR

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YOUR LAST CHANCE TO WIN THE £23 JOHNSON MOTOR !

MANY STORIES RECEIVED FOR THE SECOND MONTH OF OUR COMPETITION, ONLY 15 MORE DAYS IN WHICH TO SEND IN YOUR ENTRY.

THE second month of our competition for the £23 Johnson Junior Sea Horse outboard motor produced a very satisfactory spate of literary efforts from readers all over the country.

One which we considered to be particularly entertaining was that submitted by Mr. G. J. Hamilton, and we publish his story, entitled “Race Declared Void” as the pick of the bunch received this month.

Of the rest, Mr. Drew Barr very neatly made a story of a young man turning his desire for an outboard motor-boat into reality by means of the MOTOR SPORT competition. Mr. H. C. C. McGregor’s entry was of the type we have classified as ” rescue stories.” The story we published last month was of this type, but Mr. McGregor has added a new twist to the series by describing a Canadian forest-fire. In” Fire” the saving of an observer who was surrounded by flames is accomplished by means of a skiff propelled by a Johnson motor.

The proverbial difficulty experienced by beginners in starting their engines formed the nucleus of a good story by Mr. S. L. Donnan. The hero eventually saved his boat by reading the instruction-book carefully. Good man! So far, the grim, gruesome and macabre has been mainly absent from the entries received. This has been made up for by a story called ” Reunion,” sent in by J. E. Oliver. Right until the end the tale seems to be just another love-story of a

typical reunion. We wish we had space to publish the story in full, but the end will have to suffice. First, let us explain that the two lovers had quarrelled and “Archie had been the rock on which we had split.” After two years they meet again, and go fishing in an outboard motor boat. On their last cast “the line seemed heavier for every foot it was dra.wn up. We had obviously fouled something or other that was being brought to the surface. As the line came in our excitement grew until, peering down I was able to discern the dim shape of a human body. Up and up it came until there was no doubt whatever. Then, at last I leaned over the bows and found myself looking on the white, dripping face of . . . Archie.” Candour, especially when it puts the writer in an unfavourable light, is apt to have the opposite effect on the reader. This is the case with the story by P. Hampson called “My

rst 1 i,xperience in Outboard Motorboating,” in which the writer courageously confesses to coining a considerable purler when he tries to corner at high speed—with the inevitable result. How to Enter—Your Last

Chance !

From now until the 15th August is the last period in which a story can be submitted. For the sake of those who are making their first acquaintance with this competition, an outline of the rules will be of interest. All you have

to do is to write a story of 500 words, having some relation with outboard racing. Whether this is true or imaginary does not matter in the least. We have already received stories during the last two months, and will give our decision after the next period has expired.

You know the prize : a Johnson Junior Sea Horse outboard motor, the retail price of which is £23. In case you are not an out-boardist, we can tell you that the Johnson Junior is the last word in economical power-boating. It is produced in the largest outboard motor factory in the world, and has years of valuable experience in this industry behind its design and workmanship.

And this wonderful little motor can be yours—for a story of 500 words, fact or fiction !

THE COMPETITION RULES.

1. Stories must be written on one side of the paper only, and must be approximately 500 words in length.

2. Competitors must submit their stories not later than the 15th of July, 1933. 3. Any number of stories may be

sent in by competitors, but each must be accompanied by a separate coupon, which will be found on the inside back cover of this issue of MOTOR SPORT.

4. Stories must be about some incident connected with small-power motorboating, real or imaginary.

5. The Editor’s decision is final.

6. No member of the staff of MOTOR SPORT is allowed to compete.