TWO NEW BOOKS

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TWO NEW BOOKS

“Grand Prix Facts and Figures,” by George Monkhouse, published by Foals, has just been issued in revised form, with new material, many new photographs, and tabular race reports from 1894 to 1952. Just before this review copy was received we had taken the 1950 edition from the bookcase to re-read and decided that it is perhaps the best general motor-racing book of all. Monkhouse is a knowledgeable enthusiast and a first-class high-speed photographer, and his book gives a fine insight into motor racing, with scores of intimate ” shots” of famous drivers and care, clearly reproduced, some pictures of the early days, brief biographies of the great drivers whom the author so greatly admires, and a condensed history of racing itself. The table of results alone is an epic achievement. The new edition is right up to date and runs to 296 9 in. by 5-1 in. pages, and costs 42s.

“Britain’s Racing Cycles,” by L. R. Higgins, comes from the same prolific publisher and, running to 155 pages of the same size, costs 15s. It gives the specifications and racing achievements of many historic motor-cycles and illustrates many. Nit feel this book is likely to be appreciated even more by car than motor-cycle readers, because whereas the latter may recall the better-known marlines, car enthusiasts who require a quick printer to two-wheeler lure, perhaps as an incentive or aid in looking for a vintage motor-cycle to keep their vintage cars company, will fled this “just the job,” and are likely to get carried on to Crewe-” if browsing through its nostalgic pages in the train. From this point of view the book is an essential investment. The author writes of production as well as about racing bicycles, and the book undoubtedly benefits from the fact that he is himself a racing motor-cyclist.—W. B.

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