A Sprint G. N.

Author

W.B.

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Current page

53

Current page

54

Current page

55

Current page

56

Current page

57

Current page

58

Current page

59

Current page

60

Current page

61

Current page

62

Current page

63

Current page

64

Current page

65

Current page

66

At the V.S.C.C. Silverstone meeting we fell over a small racing car in the Paddock, but otherwise took no particular notice of it. Calling on Nigel Arnold-Foster the other day we realised that what had caused our tumble was his new sprint car and that really we should have taken more notice of it.

Arnold-Foster’s idea is to possess a car which is in the best tradition of the sprint cars of the late nineteen-twenties, yet which will perform adequately at present-day vintage events. Built in ten days and nights, the resultant car consists of a decently-long-wheelbase G.N. chassis with drilled side-members, into which has been installed a fairly, normal four-cylinder 1 1/2-litre side-valve Anzani engine. This engine has a “1/2-race” camshaft, a compression-ratio of 7.5 to 1, and a barrel-type Solex carburetter fed from a two-gallon Esso tin forming the fuel tank, by grace of an air-pump supplied by V. M. Herrington. Ignition is by a Watford magneto, and the exhaust stub ends at the cockpit, about 6 in. from the exhaust manifold.

The drive passes through a “bitsa” clutch, largely modified from pure-G.N. to part-Frazer-Nash after it blew-up and savaged the driver’s legs, and a 16-in, propeller-shaft to G.N. bevel-box and a two-speed dog-clutch-and-chain G.N. transmission. For Prescot ratios of 6.2 to 1 and 8.3 to 1 art used; for Silverstone they are changed to 3.5 and 4.5 to 1.

The solid back axle is located by specially-long dural radius arms, made originally by Dick Caesar, and the chassis boasts one tubular cross-member fabricated by the same gentleman.

Front suspension is Morgan-type, ex-Freikaiserwagen, there are Morgan front brakes, but no back brakes, and the front wheels are G.N., with home-made hubs each having four roller bearings. The back wheels are built onto G.N. hubs and carry 5.20 by 15 tyres; the front tyre size is 3.50 by 19. The wheelbase measures 7 ft. 2 in. and the front track is 4 ft. 1 in., the rear track 3 ft. 7 in,

The low bonnet terminates in a swept-up scuttle and cockpit from the ex-Watkins G.N. and a wasp-like tail ending flush with the back wheels covers the fuel tank, the intrepid driver witting between the chains in an ex-Horsa glider seat which has been reduced in width so that it is no longer possible to wear a parachute.

The steering is geared 1/3 of a turn lock to lock and the lock is quite generous and full lock used frequently to retain control.

The tiny radiator, carrying a G.N. hub badge, is a delightfully narrow affair, specially made up for the car out of a Ford shell. The weight distribution is about 50/50 and this G.N. Special weighs 6 1/2 cwt., or about half as much as Arnold-Foster’s Anzani Frazer-Nash, which, incidentally, has Salmson front brakes, and a homemade deflector cylinder head. Amongst his considerable stock of Anzani spares the owner has the twin-overhead-camshaft engine with roller-bearing crankshaft and Roots blower used by the late E. A. D. Eldridge, this having been installed in a special Frazer-Nash chassis before the war, but later replaced by a Meadows engine. Next year it. is hoped that this engine can he built up and used in this very pleasant and potent “period” G.N. — W. B.