Roverdom

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admin

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Sir,

Having enjoyed the article on “How Rovers are made,” I cannot resist sending you “Roverdom” telling how “Rovers were made”! Here you can see the old craftsman taking a keen interest in his job and even get a sniff of “Brunswick Black” as you admire the clean design and the finish on the iron and aluminium castings and drop forgings, and the chassis frame. These were exciting days when a new car was a thrill!

What a lovely little car the 8 h.p. single-cylinder was, with its varnished ash spokes and beautifully painted body. The engine ran as smoothly as a “four.”

Being a Flat-Twin fan, having owned various Douglas motor cycles I naturally went in for 8 h.p. Rovers and ran them until neither Rover nor the junk yards could produce another spare part; so these were followed by Jowett “Flying Fox” two-seaters, again till spare, became difficult. The last car did 160,000 odd miles and fetched £120 in 1948. The gearbox and back axle were still in perfect condition.

I am only hoping that my 1 1/4 M.G. saloon will do as well.

I am, Yours, etc.,
Edgbaston.
A. E. Phillips.