Any J.M.B.s left?

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92

Sir,
I recently published a book on the industries of the New Forest town of Ringwood, Hampshire, and a correspondent, Mr. Peter Trill of Ringwood, has sent me further details of an intriguing little 3-wheeler car which was apparently made in Ringwood during 1933-35, in a building in the Quomp which had previously had a history as a collar-and-cuff factory and which still exists. Your readers may be interested in the details I have so far been able to collect.

The car was called the J.M.B., after the initials of the makers, Messrs. G. H. Jones, R. W. Mason and C. S. Barrow. It had an ingenious 348-c.c. two-stroke engine, cruised happily at 35-37 m.p.h., and averaged 65 m.p.g. It made its bow in the 1933 Show (Motorcycle Show).

It was made with a 4-seater body with an ash frame which formed the chassis, an air-cooled side-valve J.A.P. engine, and an Albion 3-speed and reverse gearbox, both the latter parts being mounted on a heavy tubular T-sub-frame which also carried the rear wheel. Two transverse springs supported the steering heads of the front wheel acting as the front axle. Other features included a kick-starter, coil ignition, inter-connected 3-wheel brakes, steering via chain gearing, 25 x 3.25 in. tyres, 7-in. headlamps, hood, safety glass windscreen and a hand-operated wiper. All this for £75 10s.!

Later a Special was introduced with two seats and an o.h.v. 497-c.c. engine. The market for 3-wheelers declined by 1935 and production ceased that year.

I should be interested to hear from any of your readers who may have owned and run any J.M.B.s.

Donald A.E. Cross.
Witney,