A Morgan 4/4 in Hong Kong

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Sir,
Having subtly exchanged with my husband our infant son for the family Motor Sport which arrived today, I am up in arms at the fatuous comments of your soft-living employee who tested the Morgan 4/4. My ensuing comments are based on our three months ownership of a B.R.G. (what else!) Morgan Plus Four. They must perforce be confined to non-mechanical matters as I am (a) a mere woman, and (b) we wanted a really hairy sports car.

Firstly, whilst admitting the veracity of the comments regarding its somewhat conservative design and appearance, surely this only goes to show that something so good will inevitably last a long time. Regarding the weather-proofing of the car, it has been our experience that the majority of modern sports (so-called) cars tend to be oven-like in this climate and the high velocity draughts afforded by the Morgan construction are most welcome. In this context one must mention the gap under the windscreen which, in the typhoon season, daily serves to preserve my schoolgirl complexion; In a variety of clothing, including tight sheath dressess, I can at all times enter and leave the car without any loss of dignity. Many of our less-knowledgeable friends find it quite unnecessary to even open the doors.

The position of the dip-switch and front suspension lubrication mechanism in relation to the other foot controls is a joy to all who have at any time secretly aspired to an appearance at Covent Garden. The arrangement of the instruments on the dashboard, i.e., with the rev.-counter in front of the driver and speedometer well over to the passenger side (thus being almost invisible to the driver) demonstrates that at least one motor company believes that attention to the condition of the engine is more important than road traffic signs. Additionally, our model is fitted with a toggle switch which at first proved to have no function at all, thus affording my husband a contented three hours’ delighted searching until he discovered a blanked-off spotlight lead adjacent to the off-side front suspension.

The unlidded cubby-hole (the subject of a slightly scathing comment by your tester) affords a private sanctuary for tiny treasures belonging to our 14-month old son, thus distracting him from such childish pastimes as taking the knob off the gear-stick and removing the ignition key. The inadequate tiny rear-view mirror that you mention is a favourite toy of his as it is so easily removable from the windscreen where my husband painstakingly sticks it every, time we go out.

Continuing through the test of your otherwise excellent report, I must concur with your comments on the light clutch pedal. This I find conserves my strength for changing through the well-known Jaguar gearbox. The observations regarding the comfort of the ride reveal the pitiful lack of enthusiasm on the part of the modern road tester for truly examining the conditions of the road. The scuttle shake and general body rattles are music to mine ears. Your comments on the subject of the road-holding leave me aghast. You are either “with” the skittishness of this kitty or you are not. Period.

I forbear to comment on your mentioning other current “sports cars” in the same text as a report on a Morgan. It is with pride that I relate the fact that when once, sitting alone in the Morgan, I heard a transatlantic voice saying “Do you mind if I inspect the body, Ma’am?” I was left in no doubt that it was the car to which the sailor referred.

The concluding paragraph of your article attributes much of the credit for the continued popularity to Messrs. Lawrence and Shepherd-Barron; much as these two worthy gentlemen have contributed to this fine car, I feel sure that as long as there are Elizabethan pioneers with true thick red blood in their veins there will always be a market for these cars.

The true enthusiast never receives anything but courteous assistance from the Morgan Motor Company and we will put forward the slogan “You don’t have to buy the finest medium-price sports car in the world.”

Una Maderson.
Hong Kong.

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