Morgan memories

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Thanks for the articles on Morgans. My brother-in-law was a Morgan fan so I had some second-hand experience of them. They could certainly climb, Rest and be Thankful top gear (except the hairpin which was cobbled in those days with a severe bump up onto the cobbles). Kirkstone, nae bother at a’. The Haylie Brae out of Largs surprised a Rolls owner by the way the Morgan picked up from low speed in top to leave him standing. I had a 588-c.c. Norton o.h.v. 4-speed and sidecar which had the legs of the Aero Morgan but could not climb like it. One Sunday I made up on a string of four Morgans and proceeded to pick them off, I took two and then the road got twisty on the drop to the river Mouse before Lanark so we all kept station through Lanark and down over Hyndford bridge, thereafter the road straightens and the procession speeded up. I took the third Morgan easily enough and appeared to have the edge on the fourth and last until alongside when he showed his real colours, opened up and left me standing. After that I could recognise Spouse when I saw him! ! !

Glasgow tram rails were sods when Morgan-mounted, as you had about 8 inches maximum leeway before one of the wheels got on the rail causing oscillating movements and a final breakaway which required direct steering to correct quickly enough.

One busy Saturday evening coming through Coatbridge the nearside wheel went over the wire front a cycle tyre lying unseen on the road, the wire jumped up and wedged itself between the brake shoe and drum, locking the wheel and proving the Morgans could do better than turn on a sixpence, threepence was more than ample.

The rear springs passed straight through guide shackles on the Aero and a good bump taken fast deflected the springs enough to let the ends come clear of the shackles and drop the bodywork onto the rear tyre, it was probably a “fail safe” idea as the additional friction ensured a smart stop. Once you found this out for yourself Morgan could supply longer main leaves which could not get free of the shackles.

Morgans had character, offered more weather protection than a sidecar outfit and were less tiring on a long run. There was enough room on the roads in those days for their idiosyncrasies.

Airdrie. Geo. A. Turner.