The Things They Say ...

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“Many slow drivers are not without their share of blame for accidents by refusing to give faster cars the opportunity to overtake. This is a necessary politeness that is far too often ignored, causing frustration and anger.” — J. Horsbrugh-Porter writing on “Manners, Good and Bad” in the Summer Number of The Lady.

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“Readers who have not seen a copy of the magazine ——— would do well to obtain one and read it from cover to cover. Unlike most other motor magazines, ——— caters exclusively for the enthusiast. Biased neither in favour of the ordinary motorist nor the purely racing reader, it provides the reader with just the sort of information that normally he finds so hard to discover. No space is wasted writing up dull motor cars such as ‘estate’ versions of touring cars, or giving hints and tips to the average driver.” — The Bugatti Owners’ Club doing a self-appointed job of public relations work in Bugantics. But, do you know, the current issue of ——— contains road-test reports on three different estate-cars. . .!

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“The Association believes that a 70-m.p.h. speed limit on all purpose roads should be made permanent at the end of the present experimental period. . . . on motorways . . . we are satisfied that a combination of factors, including police supervision, have led to a reduction in high-speed travel which may have had a significant effect on casualty rates. . . . The A.A. Committee recommends an advisory speed limit on motorways of 70 m.p.h., which it believes would be preferable to an absolute limit. . . .” — A letter from the A.A. to Mrs. Barbara Castle, which shows there is not much help in that quarter for those who are opposed to an overall 70-limit on British roads.