Editorial, August 2000

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Current page

53

Current page

54

Current page

55

Current page

56

Current page

57

Current page

58

Current page

59

Current page

60

Current page

61

Current page

62

Current page

63

Current page

64

Current page

65

Current page

66

Current page

67

Current page

68

Current page

69

Current page

70

Current page

71

Current page

72

Current page

73

Current page

74

Current page

75

Current page

76

Current page

77

Current page

78

Current page

79

Current page

80

Current page

81

Current page

82

Current page

83

Current page

84

Current page

85

Current page

86

Current page

87

Current page

88

Current page

89

Current page

90

Current page

91

Current page

92

Current page

93

Current page

94

Current page

95

Current page

96

Current page

97

Current page

98

Current page

99

Current page

100

Current page

101

Current page

102

Current page

103

Current page

104

Current page

105

Current page

106

Current page

107

Current page

108

Current page

109

Current page

110

Current page

111

Current page

112

Current page

113

Current page

114

Current page

115

Current page

116

Current page

117

Current page

118

Current page

119

Current page

120

Current page

121

Current page

122

Current page

123

Current page

124

Current page

125

Current page

126

Current page

127

Current page

128

Current page

129

Current page

130

Current page

131

Current page

132

Current page

133

Current page

134

Current page

135

Current page

136

Current page

137

Current page

138

Current page

139

Current page

140

Current page

141

Current page

142

Current page

143

Current page

144

Current page

145

Current page

146

Current page

147

Current page

148

After the deaths and injuries at the Goodwood Festival of Speed it would be too easy to conclude that if such events were not allowed, then people would still be alive and their families not ripped apart.

The truth is, we love the Festival, we have supported it for years and will continue to do so if, as I hope and expect, it remains on the calendar. That said, there are always lessons to learn and if such events make us think of ways in which the risk can be reduced without spoiling the event, then some good emerges from the disaster.

I spoke to a dozen drivers on the Sunday, and all thought the event should continue but that the competitive element should cease, and I found it hard to disagree.

This is not a race, nor even primarily a hillclimb. It is a motoring pageant where people go to see heroes drive cars usually found in museums. Yes, we want to see them go swiftly, but there’s a world of difference between putting on a show, booting the tail out for the crowd, and actually seeing how fast you can get up the hill.

I’m not saying that, had this been the case, there would have been fewer casualties at Goodwood. But such a move would reduce the likelihood of accidents without, I feel, hurting the event in any significant way; for that reason alone, it has to be worthy of consideration.

This is my last issue as the editor of Motor Sport. After more than three years of taking the credit for returning it to critical acclaim and commercial success, it is time to let someone else have the fun. The truth is, I was just one of several who made the magazine what it is today and all deserve the plaudits. I am going simply because I have done the job I came to do and if the magazine is to take the next step, it needs to be with someone else’s feet under the desk.

But while I am returning to my old life as a mainstream motoring hack, I will not be going altogether. I will continue to write for Motor Sport every month for as long as its new editor can put up with me. He is Paul Feamley, former editor of Motoring News and F1 Racing, a man with an awesome knowledge of and passion for this sport and its history. Those of you who read Fl Racing will realise also that few know more about how to put a magazine together. There is no better person for this wonderful job.

Finally, I wish to thank every reader who has been with us these last few years. It is you, not me, who put this tide back on the map; watching it happen has been the greatest privilege of my career.

You may also like

Related products