Driving in Fog.

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Driving in Fog.

AT the recent International Illumination Congress held at Cambridge, the fallacy of using a yellow light to improve penetration during fog was raised by The Automobile Association’s representative, and unanimously supported.

Fog contains minute droplets of water which act as lenses, consequently the more powerful the illumination, the greater is the reflection.

Coloured rays merely reduce the intensity of the light. The following recommendations are made for driving in fog :—

Direct a fairly intense concentrated beam to the nearside of the road, either from a fog lamp on the nearside dumbiron, or a spot light attached to the nearside pillar of the windscreen. Thus the driver is able to look either over or under the beam. Where special fog directing lights are not available—

Extinguish the offside headlamp and direct the other headlamp beam on the nearside of the road. This method necessitates driving close to the nearside kerb. Again, tissue paper of one or more thicknesses attached to the outside of the

headlamp glasses, or whitening mixed with water, will be found helpful. If the driver has a preference for any colour which suits his sight, tinted tissue paper, or dry colour mixed with the whitening will produce the desired effect.

Either of the foregoing is easily removed, and does not involve exposing the lamp reflector, which is undesirable.

Ancient Armoured Cars.

ARMObRED cars which have recently been in action on the North West Frontier in India are a remarkable proof of the quality of British engineering.

The cars—fifteen of them—have been undergoing some extremely strenuous work on the exacting hill roads of North West India. It is surprising, therefore, to learn that their vintage ranges from 1909-1914 and that they have been in continuous use since then. The cars were built by Rolls-Royce and from 1911-1914 most of them were in Mesopotamia. During the War, they all saw service in various ways and in 1920 they were sent to India for use as armoured cars on the Frontier for five years, where they ran at least 6,000 miles per year. It is estimated that each of the cars has

covered altogether well over 80,000 miles. A sixteenth car which began its career as an armoured car with the others is now in use as an instructional chassis.

No other country in the world could turn out cars which would staud up to such hard work and still be in perfect running order after fifteen or twenty years.

Dunlop Appointments.

THE Board of Directors of the Dunlop Rubber Co. Ltd., have appointed Mr. Albert Healey, who has been technical manager at Fort Dunlop since 1927, to be Works Director at Birmingham, in succession to Mr. J. L. Collyer, who took over the position temporarily after the death of the late Mr. J. T. Ramlles. Mr. Healey has also been appointed to a seat on the local board.

Mr. Collyer has joined the headquarters staff in London so as to be also available for work in connection with other factories of the Company at home and abroad.

For the past sixteen years Mr. Healey has been engaged in important research work into manufacturing operations at home and abroad and members of the Institution of Automobile Engineers will remember the papers which he has been nvited to read ‘before that body.