The Way of Things

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Tpossibility of a British racing car is one which is often discussed by the motoring fraternity, and the fact that at present all racing car events go to foreign makes is sometimes used as an argument that foreign sports cars are definitely superior to ours. But that we can produce sports cars of equal merit to our rivals is evidenced by the firms of 1..G., Talbot and Riley, to mention but three who have taken a big part in the season’s racing. Their success is .sufficient to show that there is a good choice available

without going abroad.

In the matter of the genuine racing car, we shall never be able to compete successfully, or even wish to compete at all, until a road race for such cars is actually held in this country. A sports car race would pave the way and arouse the public’s desire for more, but at present the chances of any such event are frustrated by the obstructive and retrograde policy of the authorities. There are at present three possible ways open. The first is the introduction of a Road Racing Bill, which, as It will have to be a private members’ bill, is unlikely at Present to survive the atti

tude of the authorities we have mentioned. The second is the closing of, say, Richmond Park, and holding a race therein, a suggestion which has already been made by our contemporary, The Motor. The difficulties in the way are considerable, but we hope not insurmountable. The third course is the adaption or construction of a suitable venue in the grounds of some private estate, and it is here that the attraction lies of the project being undertaken by the Automobile •Racing Association on the shore of the Wash.

If any such schemes can be completed in the near future there would be a stimulus for motor racing which would probably lead to the reintroduction of the genuine racing car as a means of development in this country. If this comes, we should have no great difficulty in finding the brains, material, and drivers for supplying a British team.

But until this is done it is pretty safe to prophesy that we, in this country, shall have to leave the field of genuine racing to our foreign rivals, who from the earliest days have had the advantage of being encouraged not only by the public, but the authorities as well.