A Brooklands Suggestion.

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A Brooklands Suggestion.

has been suggested that the attraction of Motor Racing and more especially Brooklands is not going

ahead in a manner which the enthusiast would like to see, it being still difficult to convince the man in the street, who might be a paying spectator, that cars used in races, other than those for racing cars, are anything resembling those that he can buy. What real touring car has a super

charger—a device to the average owner meaning one thing—special, and furthermore what British manufacturers listing a supercharged model do not make that same car in unblown form ? In the races of about 1929—I quote

the Double 12 especially—fields were probably larger than at any other time. Cars then had to be fully equipped and I do think this was an important point. Racing cars do not carry lamps and hoods, therefore those cars which were seen were not so different from the standard was the opinion of many. This may seem trivial but the point has been raised in conversation many times in discussion by the ordinary owner. Those people who have Grand Prix cars

are apparently unwilling to race them at Brooklands, in events over 200 miles (see 500-Mile Race 1933). Why spoil a good car on a rough track has sometimes been the excuse, so for once need not be catered for. Now comes the main point, is not the

time ripe for a revival of a Double 12 Hour Race for Standard (subject to the usual permitments) Unsupercharged cars, fully equipped, to be run on a handicap basis and a sliding scale of engine capacity, not just by classes. Let the race be run at Brooklands and use the old 1929 course. Start the race on the first day at 11 a.m. and finish at 11 p.m. thereby giving some three hours or so of darkness. The second day from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. and make the first 20 laps each day be with hoods raised. The race must be of sufficient length so that tortoises have a chance against hares. There seems at present to be a revival

of sports cars even though they have odd capacities and surely if manufacturers are sounded support might be forthcoming. Large prizes if possible and entrance fees on a basis of starters’ half fees to be returned, finishers all back.

I suggest a race of this description would not only draw the makers but the public once again to see the cars as they can buy, competing against each other.

What hopes are there in this scheme for 1934? I am, yours, etc.,

W. M. COUPER.

St. Albans.

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