NEWS FROM THE U.S.A.

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NEWS FROM THE U.S.A. REX MAYS LEADS PACIFIC COAST CHAMPIONSHIP RACE—MAURI ROSE, AL THEISON INJURED—WARM FIGHT ON FOR EASTERN CHAMPIONSHIP—SNOWBERGER WINS RACE.

HOILY contested races for the annual A.A.A. sectional championships held the major interest in the States during last summer and early autumn. Rex Mays has a clear lead for the Pacific Southwest Championship, and appears certain to win the title at this writing. Johnny Hannon and Billy Winn are in a very hot battle for Eastern honors, while the veteran Chester Gardner leads the Southern Championship rating.

Al Gordon, Coast champion in 1933, and Bob Sall, Eastern titlist last year, have both been bobbed by motor troubles this year, and it now appears that both will lose their championships. ‘Wild Bill” Cummings still leads the

National Championship races, but will probably be forced to defend his comparatively slim lead twice before the end of the year. Championship races will probably be held at Mines Field and Oakland, California. Young Ben Shaw, for whom we predicted a brilliant future in these columns last year, has enjoyed an extremely fine summer season, defeating many crack drivers in races at Hohokus, Brockton and Mineola. At the Brockton races one of BY OwAmerican Correspondent T. MERIWETHER-SMITH

the largest sporting crowds in -New England history witnessed the races.

During the races at Hohokus, Manni Rose, driving the lightning fast MarksMiller job, lost control of the car on a curve, vaulted the outer guard rail, and overturned. The -car was considerably damaged, but Mauri escaped with minor hurts.

Al Theison, veteran Dayton driver, was badly hurt in a crash at the Dayton speedway late in the summer. The race, one of the most sensational in. speedway history, found Doc Mackenzie, Johnny Sawyer, and young Floyd Davis battling. for the lead in 50 thrill-packed circuits of the fast oval. Sawyer finally won by a car-length from Mackenzie. Russ Snowberger won the 50-mile feature at Flint, Michigan, late in Septern

ber, nosing-out Gene Haustein by one second. Al Miller was third and ” Doc ” Williams fourth.

Johnny Hannon won the feature event at Trenton in September, with Davis second, and Maynard Clark third. Billy Winn smashed through the fence in the trials and overturned, but escaped injury. Hannon also won the feature event at Reading, Pa., in his Miller.

*. Sam Purvis wOn the 100-mile stock car race at Jacksonville, Fla., over a road course, driving a Ford V-8. Ted Chamberlain, who has driven at Indianapolis,

was second in a similar car. This was not an A.A.A. race.

Ray Campbell, who drove at Indianapolis the last two years, was injured in a terrible crash at Detroit early in October. He received Only minor injuries, but the fact that Campbell was wearing an English-type crash helmet is credited with saving his life.