THE BUGATTI OF 1937

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THE BUGATTI OF 1937

Two Bugatti models will be offered for next season, the 3.3-litre Type 57 and the Type 575, or ” Competition ” edition of the 3.3-litre. A very beantifully produced catalogue has arrived from Molsheim, the frolitispieee of which reminds us that Ettore Bugatti is still very busy with rail-cars, as well as recalling the outstanding successes which the maroue gained in this year’s classic sports-car races, The 3.3-litre was victorious in the G.P. de l’A.C.F., G.P. de Marne, G.P. de Deauville, and G.P. du Cornminges, also taking six Class C records at 125-128 m.p.h. There is no production car which better makes use of experience gleaned from racing-car construction than the 3.3-litre Bugatti. The Type 57 was introduced in 1934, being road tested by MoTort SPORT in May of that year, and Brian Lewis, Lord. Howe, Percy Fawcett, T. A. S. 0. 3.1athieson, T. Rand, Lindsay Eccles, N. S. Etribiricos, Col. G. M. Giles, Noel Rees and other notable sportsmen purchased the production model for high speed touring. The straight-eight engine is of unit fixed-head conStruetion, with a bore and stroke of 72 mm. x 100 mm. (3,255 c.c.). Two valves are accommodated in each hemispherical combustion chamber, actuated by twin o.h. camshafts driven by gears from the rear of the crankshaft. The crankshaft is fully balanced, statically and dynamically, and runs in six plain bearings. The crankcase has a flat bottom with twelve cooling fins running its full length. The cam-cases retain the familiar square shape and high finish, and each cam cover is held down by nine pairs of studs. The oil-filler and external oil-filter are positioned on the near side, as is the ribbed single piece exhaust manifold. The ‘cooling system embodies a pump and a fourbladed fan driven by belt from the crankshaft. Ignition is by coil. On the Type 57 a single Stromberg carburetter feeds the eight cylinders, via a hot-jacketed circular section external manifold, held down by eight studs. The petrol pump and distributor are driven from the rear end of the ,off-side camshaft. There is a single plug in the centre of each cylinderhead. The Type 575 engine has double carburetters, and a compression ratio of about 7 to 1.. It functions on No. 1 fuel and is said to develop 148 b.h.p. at just under 5,000 r.p.m. In unit with the engine is a four-Speed gearbox with constant-mesh, helical silent pinions for second, third and top gears. The gearlever is centrally placed, and of considerable length. The Type 57 has ratios of 11.6, 7.5, 5.37 and 4.17 to 1. Those of the Type 575 are 10.37, 6.95, 4.98 and 3.85 to 1. The Type 57 has 5.50″ x 18′ tyres and the 575 has tyres of this section on the front wheels and 6.00’ x 18″ covers on the rear, an unusual arrangement. The axle ratios are 12 x 50 and 14 x 54 respectively. At 1,000 r.p.m. in top gear the 57 does 20.5 m.p.h. and the 575 22:4 m.p.h. The clutch is of dry disc type. The chassis frame is dropped to give a low c. of g. and has the famous reversed quarter-elliptic springs at the

rear. The front axle is a single-piece forging, with the leaves of the halfelliptiz springs passing through it.

It is of interest that Bugatti has not adopted independent suspension, for the “three-three ” has remarkable roadholding qualities, claimed to be further improved as a result of racing lessons. Each brake drum has four deep cooling ribs and the two-shoe brakes are carefully compensated. The engine unit is flexibly mounted at five points. The 57,5 has a wheelbase of 9 ft. 94 in., an overall width of 13 ft. 3 in., and a tank capacity of twenty gallons. The figures for the 57 are 10 ft. 10 in., 14 ft. 4 in., and twenty-two gallons respectively. Both chassis have a track of 4 ft. 5 in. and a weight of 19 cwt. The 57 gives 18 approximately, $00-1,000 m.p.g. of oil, and has a speed range of 8-90 m.p.h.. in

top gear. The 5’75 does 12-115 m.p.h. in its highest ratio. The chassis prices at present rate of exchange are i775 and

:i:995 respectively. The remarkable remote controlled Be Rham shock-absorbers are used. The Type 57 combines an astounding performance with extremely docile silent running, hohls the road like a raeing-car, and is economical to maintain and does not demand too frequent attention. When we tested the 1934 model, 105 m.p.h. was reached on the road, the flying kilometre was clocked at 100 m.p.h. and 10-80 m.p.h. occupied 25 sees. —that with closed coaehwork. The 57S

has a truly astonishing performance, being capable of 115 m.p.h., which is remarkably good for an unblown sportscar. A well-known English competition driver is said to have placed an order for the open two-seater 575 at Olympia. Various striking French bodies are available and English Coachwork can be fitted. Above we have quoted high-gear ratios for the 7S, but normally those used for the 57 are now fitted. The Bugatti is backed by service and spates facilities in this country, and full particulars are available from Col. W. L. Sorel, D.5.0., Ettore Bugatti Automobiles, 1-3, Brixton Road, London, S.W.9. How refreshing it is to write of a truly individualistic, really advanced motor-car once again.