Odd Spots

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Odd Spots

R. G. J. Nash is now with Simmonds Accessories Ltd., and has forsaken his Ford V8 for an Austin Ten. Hatcher, who was his mechanic about the time of the “Terror,” most potent blown s.v. Anzani job of all time, is now an instructor at the R.A.O.C. training school at IslewoTtli and uses his P-type M.G. for daily transport.

C. H. Peacock is concentrating on motorboating on the Thames, now his road motoring is curtailed, although towing his dinghy down to the West Country on the trailer made from a drilled Frazer-Nash chassis, behind his faithful Gwynne Eight, being out of the question, he is anxious to find a home for this car. It is taxable at 8 h p., has the three-bearing o.h.v. engine, and, with good modern section tyres, touring body with excellent hood and safety-glass screen, and a maximum of about 60 m.p.h., is a quite roadworthy proposition. There is a f.w.b. axle available and two spare engines, one with rebored block. If no one wants it, it is likely to be sacrificed at the end of the year in the national cause There is also an o.h. inlet G.N. V-twin engine awaiting a like fate. Anyone interested ?

Alan May’s very well-preserved and potent ” 30/98 ” Vauxhall is on the road again, and, attended the Streatham and D. M.C.C. Red Roads Hill Climb.

An Edwardian Wolseley tourer, in extremely good condition, with 16 h.p. Vickers eng:ne, has turned up in a London dealer’s yard. Vintage ears have certainly not all gone to make ” Spitfires,” and in the London area a black and yellow Swift Ten coupe, one of the now rare Fiat Eight tourers, a Schneider, many Bentleys and a fine Lancia Lambda ” saloon have been noted, while an electrical engineer’s beautifully preserved, if very slow, 1923 Charron-Laycock continues in use.

Marcus Chambers’s premises having been taken over by the military, the 1908 Hutton and Targa Florio Alfa-Romeo were removed to London on lorries, and later the Hutton was towed at a shattering speed in a storm behind a ” 30/98 ” Vauxhall, for storage at Beaconsfield. The original carburetter and other parts are at the Chelsea garage.

John Bolster is a member of the Home Guard. He relies largely on his sense of hearing to determine if all is well, and believes that if widespread use of cars is encouraged for such duty in country districts only confusion will result. Michael May has turned motor-cyclist, with a pushrod Norton. His Alvis was doing about 100 m.p.h. in road trim when the war came:

Prince Chula points out that the 1939 Nuffield Trophy Race was a scratch event, not a handicap as in previous years, as was stated in error in the September issue.

A reader well known to the motor-racing world is anxious to obtain information relating to road-racing in America up to the time of the road-race ban. Can anyone help, please ?

Flight-Lieut. C. F. Currant, recently awarded the D.F.C., started motoring with a tuned Morris Minor and now runs an early M.G. Midget.

R. Parnell has acquired the famous l i-litre SeamanDelage from Prince Chula and has converted it back to normal suspension. He also has an independently sprung tubular chassis with the spare Delage engine installed, and has the Parnell-Special finished, and he is said to crave an E.R.A. His 4.9-litre B.H.W. has been sold to a Sheffield driver.

Donington’s grandstand and pits have been broken up to increase the national timber store.