Vauxhall's Show

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Exhibitions by individual manufacturing groups have been popular in this year of Jubilee, and Vauxhall Motors, Ltd., put on an especially good show at the showrooms at their Luton works. This free exhibition is announced as to continue until further notice; and will be open when these words appear.

By all means go to see it. The oldest car on view is a 1903 single-cylinder, tiller-steered Vauxhall with its solid rear axle sprung on coil springs and driven by a central chain. A similar 1905 car, giving 7 h.p. at 950 r.p.m., is seen to have transmission by side chains and rather more normal contracting brakes. Naturally, a very fine specimen of O.E. “30/98 “Vauxhall 4-seater and an equally well-preserved 1910 “Prince Henry” particularly pleased us. Both these cars are the property of Vauxhall Motors, Ltd., and are in a splendid state of preservation; the Reg. No. of the “30/98” is NT 7795. To back these old cars there is a range of modern Vauxhalls, a Vauxhall-built tank engine, and a big demonstration of testing methods, accessories and parts that combine to make your Vauxhall what it is today. Also, there is a fine show of models, of the 1903 car, a war-time 25-h.p., a “Prince Henry” and the 1910 Vauxhall racing car, backed by many models of modern Bedford commercials. The early models, largely constructed by Vauxhall apprentices, are very beautiful indeed, with all details, even to security bolts in the realistic wire wheels. All are to 1/10th scale and the steering on the racing car works, from the wheels as far back as the drop arm. This car models very well indeed, with its queer, narrow radiator, slim polished-aluminium body and big disc wheels. From the model we learn that the car was so narrow that it only had two pedals, accelerator and clutch — the four outside levers are: a lever operating the air pump, the gear-lever, and two brake levers, one on the wheels and one on the transmission.

Vauxhall’s have published a most interesting book covering the story of the Company from 1857 to 1946. It contains numerous photographs of the Brooklands Vauxhalls and the early production models and is to be had for 8s. 6d. a copy, at which price we understand no profit is made.

We visited this show in a Vauxhall Ten and found this little car to cruise at a speedometer 50 m.p.h. with extreme economy and a high degree of silence and refinement.

Announcement
Pat -Whittet asks us to state that he and Bob Cowell are dissolving their present partnership in order that they may carry on with individual projects of an ambitious nature. The Whinlands Works will continue to maintain enthusiasts’ cars, while Cowell will proceed with the construction of racing cars at new premises. In spite of these new arrangements, Cowell and Whittet will continue to work in close co-operation.

The 170-m.p.h. M.G.

Lt.-Col. Gardner relied on Lucas electrical equipment, Dunlop tyres, Lodge plugs and valve cotters and collets made for him by the Monaco Engineering Co., Ltd.

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