PRICE COMPARISONS

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PRICE COMPARISONS Sir,

Much as I enjoyed your article in Moron SPORT in the November issue on the Sports Car races of 1951, two rather odd things struck me about it.

(1) You said that the Frazer-Nash costs over £3,000, and then you, rather thoughtlessly, I fear, dismissed this by saying that that was what one expected of a true sports racing car.

A Jaguar Xlc 120 or 120C costs only about half the price, is better looking, and is faster. Surely this car is the true concept of what a sports racing car should be. Some people can afford £1,500 odd on a sports racing car—few £3,000 odd on a successful car, but one that is slower than the Jaguar.

(‘) You said that cockpit error was not the fault of the designers—whose fault was it then ? Surely the designer is responsible for the design of the entire car, including the cockpit. One does not want cockpit error on any car, but even less on one that costs £.3,000. I am, Yours, etc.,

Belfast. R. C. WALLACE. (Cockpit error is an expression borrowed from the aviation chaps to imply that the pilot and not the machine was at fault —En.1

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