A Wet Brighton Run

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Protection of varying kinds from the rain on November 2nd. Mrs. Fotheringham-Parker’s 1903 8-h.p. Renault, hood up. and G. E. Solomon’s. 1904 6-h.p. umbrella up, in the early stages of the R.A.C. Veteran Car Run, followed, as they cross Westminster Bridge, by E. J. Wilde’s 1904 10/12 Tony Huber, the crew of which just got wet!

On their way – Dr. J. W. E. Fellows, whose 1904 7-h.p. Pope-Tribune carries an inappropriate registration number, passes Big Ben at a rather early hour on a Sunday morning!

A smile in spite of the rain – T. H. Boothman on the comparatively traffic-free road to Brighton. at the wheel of a 1904 10-h.p. Norfolk double-phaeton.

Miss Ruth Barton arrives thankfully at Brighton on her 1904 6-h.p. Wolseley; Lord Montagu of Beaulieu completes a satisfactorily fast drive in the Harmsworth 1903 Sixty Mercedes, the Editor of Motor Sport in the tonneau and a modern Mercedes-Benz following them in; one of the really old ones, Capt. Benbrough’s 1896 3-h.p. Leon Bollee, is directed to its bay on the Madeira Drive at the finish of another Brighton Run.

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