Was it Supernatural?

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Whilst there are numerous instances of ghostly horsemen, phantom coaches and carriages, there are few supernatural stories about motors. One of the few is described in a recently published book of 39 strange and unsolved happenings entitled Still a Mystery, written and illustrated by John Huddlestone. These “mysteries” are of absorbing interest and are most capably pictured by Mr. Huddlestone, who is well-known for this type of “cartoon.”

Number 38 deals with an allegedly haunted cross-road in the Isle of Thanet, Kent, on the main-road from Ramsgate to Canterbury. In the early 1920s this cross-road, known as Lord o’ the Manor Corner, was the scene of numerous accidents involving motor cars and motorcycles. Many of these sometimes fatal accidents were so sudden and inexplicable that the cause was put down to “supernatural influence,” which affected the drivers on reaching the crossroads. The local and National Press investigated this place of ill-repute, but found nothing tangible to account for the numerous accidents. The roads were widened later. The motor accident toll decreased, but local opinion still considers this area is haunted, and you may read all about it and 38 other mysteries in Still a Mystery, now on sale at 3s. 6d. A Grenville production, on order from your bookstall or newsagent, or direct from 15-17, City Road, London, E.C.1.