Miniatures News, December 1959

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Current page

53

Current page

54

Current page

55

Current page

56

Current page

57

Current page

58

Current page

59

Current page

60

Current page

61

Current page

62

Current page

63

Current page

64

Current page

65

Current page

66

Current page

67

Current page

68

Current page

69

Current page

70

Current page

71

Current page

72

Current page

73

Current page

74

Current page

75

Current page

76

The flood of motor-car miniatures continues and at Christmas time they are especially attractive. Playcraft have brought out a Renault Floride (No. 222) in their well-finished “Corgi” series which incorporate glazed windows and sprung wheels. Meccano Ltd. have introduced a “Dinky” VW Karmann Ghia coupe (No. 187), 3¾ in. long, priced at 3s. 6d. inclusive of purchase tax. So there you have two of Europe’s most handsome coupes in miniature. Meccano also have a Dinky Supertoys working-model B.B.C. T.V. Extending Mast Vehicle (No. 969 –13s. 6d.) and a remarkable Missile Erector Vehicle which erects and fires a scale Corporal missile (No. 666 — 28s. 9d.), both excellent Christmas gifts.

Lesney not only offer fine gift sets of their “Matchbox” series miniatures such as the Private Owner set, which contains 19 models, several of them sports cars, but have added No. 73, a detailed 10-ton R.A.F. Pressure Refuelling six-wheeler vehicle, to the range. They have also brought out another nostalgic “Model of Yesteryear” in the shape of a scale miniature of the G.W.R. locomotive “Duke of Connaught,” the 1897 4-2-2 express engine of the type which made some spectacular runs on the ocean mail specials from Plymouth to Paddington in 1903, attaining a top speed of 102 m.p.h. and averaging 77½ m.p.h. for the 118½ miles between Bristol and London with 120 tons in tow. This is No. 14 amongst these collectors’ pieces and is finished in G.W.R. colours with polished dome. It is detailed even to springs, name-plate, tool boxes and number, and all its wheels are spoked, and flanged to run on the track. The scale is 130 : 1.

We have seen a photograph of a large model of the Citroen DS19 but Citroen Cars could not provide any information, while we believe Lines Bros. have introduced a series of miniature cars to supplement their larger, electrically-propelled Triang model-car series but so far no samples have reached us. — W.B.

The B.M. Torch – a Sensible Present for the Motorist

There is no better present for the motorist, as winter closes in, than a good torch. One of the best torches for use in and out of the car that we have ever encountered is the new B.M., with revolutionary nylon switch concealed within the head. This excellent torch was evolved by the late Stuart Barker, of British Power Boats, and his designer, Mr. V. Meager, in an endeavour to produce a fool-proof portable torch.

To test it they boiled it in a pressure-cooker up to 40 lb. for an hour, submerged it 120 feet in salt water for seven days, operated the switch mechanically on-and-off 500,000 times, kept it for 48 hours in a deep-freeze at  -20 deg. F., and dropped it repeatedly on head, side and base from a height of 15 ft. onto a concrete floor, sometimes breaking the bulb but never the torch. After its successful emergence from these arduous tests they felt able to put the B.M. torch on the market and to issue a guarantee with it.

The torch has a simple rotary switch action, providing for flashing a signal as well as giving a steady concentrated searchlight-like beam. The head is of rubber, moulded to stop the torch rolling off a flat surface, the body has a hammered finish in fawn and contains a ring for hanging it up, the nylon switch is non-corrosive (corrosion ends the life of most torches) and is self-cleaning, and the construction is of Rolls-Royce quality. A Mk.II version safety-approved for use in the methane, pentane and hydrogen classes, and with lockable head to deter removal of the batteries, is available. Motorists will go for the Mk.I version, which is water-tight, gas-tight, shockproof, nylon-insulated, and well balanced, besides being rust-proofed and non-corrosive. It is said to last a man’s lifetime and would make an ideal Christmas gift. The B.M. torch is priced at 35s. and is obtainable from most good shops. In case of difficulty write to Bardic Ltd., Northam, Southampton, mentioning Motor Sport.