Wood-rimmed wheels

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Current page

53

Current page

54

Current page

55

Current page

56

Current page

57

Current page

58

Current page

59

Current page

60

Current page

61

Current page

62

Current page

63

Current page

64

Current page

65

Current page

66

Current page

67

Current page

68

Current page

69

Current page

70

Current page

71

Current page

72

Current page

73

Current page

74

Current page

75

Current page

76

Current page

77

Current page

78

Current page

79

Current page

80

Current page

81

Current page

82

Current page

83

If you subscribe to the view that the only place for wood is in trees, then read no further, for this feature deals with wood-rimmed steering wheels. Although there is some controversy over the use of wooden facias the wood-rimmed steering wheel is growing in popularity and is now commonly seen in staid saloon cars as well as the more sporting types. Three staff cars have been fitted with wooden-rimmed wheels, which are discussed here.

The Editor’s Mini-Minor is now graced with an Ashley Laminates “Springrim” wheel, which is of the three-spoke polished alloy type, while the varnished wooden rim has raised rivets on the reserve side to aid grip. The snag with this wheel is that other Mini drivers expect the car to disappear into the distance at great speed, but the engine has not been modified. The “Springrim” is available in 16-in. size for a number of British cars and the range will soon be extended to cover many other models.

The Assistant Editor’s Sprite has been fitted with a very luxurious wheel of first-class design and workmanship marketed under the name of “Formula de luxe” in Britain, “Laurie” in the United States, by Motor Books and Accessories. The rim is properly profiled to fit the hand, and finger grips ensure that the wheel cannot slip from the hand. The metal frame continues right round the rim, giving great rigidity and strength. This wheel is available in 15- and 16-in. size for a large number of British and foreign cars and ranges in price from £9 10s. to £11. Rather more expensive than the average wooden-rimmed wheel but the extra quality is well worth the price asked.

Fitted to a staff member’s Ford Special is the “Carlotti” wheel marketed by Les Leston which follows the normal practice of an aluminium frame to which a lamination of either beech or sapele has been bonded. Finish for a wheel costing £7 is good and its lightness and firmness renders it an excellent wheel for both racing and luxury machinery.