The Jowett Javelin

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Sir,
There must be many readers, if your advertisements are any criterion, who are compelled to change from 2-seaters, etc., to saloons due to fiancees, wives, storks, mothers-in-law, or merely anno domini.

I am surprised more do not do as I did over six years ago, and buy a Jowett Javelin. I know of no car which can hold a candle to it at anything like a comparable price. It is an up-to-date Aprilia or a poor man’s Flavia. It has, amongst other things, the following virtues:—
(1) Seats for six modest-sized people and also leg room for them.
(2) A vast amount of stowage space under the front seat and on the rear shelf, a more capacious luggage boot than a Rover, together with no propeller-shaft tunnel.
(3) 75 m.p.h. plus, and 30-35 m.p.g.
(4) Except for the rear plugs, very accessible for home maintenance, and spares at reasonable prices fairly easily obtained.
(5) An engine-cum-gearbox that can be removed single-handed without lifting tackle.
(6) A most comfortable ride for driver and all passengers.
(7) A good turning circle and, post-1950, good brakes.

Thinking, after a combined mileage in my three Javelins of nearly 100,000, it was time I bought something more modern, tried a Rover 105(S), a 1958 Rapier and now a 1958 ZB Magnette. The only thing which they have which the Javelin lacks is flat-out speed, and if the Javelin had overdrive on 3rd and top it would be improved somewhat in that respect.

If any reader has fitted an overdrive I would be most pleased to hear from him, because I have still got my Javelin.

Robert Barlow.
Little Baddow.