Readers' Letters, December 2009, December 2009

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Current page

53

Current page

54

Current page

55

Current page

56

Current page

57

Current page

58

Current page

59

Current page

60

Current page

61

Current page

62

Current page

63

Current page

64

Current page

65

Current page

66

Current page

67

Current page

68

Current page

69

Current page

70

Current page

71

Current page

72

Current page

73

Current page

74

Current page

75

Current page

76

Current page

77

Current page

78

Current page

79

Current page

80

Current page

81

Current page

82

Current page

83

Current page

84

Current page

85

Current page

86

Current page

87

Current page

88

Current page

89

Current page

90

Current page

91

Current page

92

Current page

93

Current page

94

Current page

95

Current page

96

Current page

97

Current page

98

Current page

99

Current page

100

Current page

101

Current page

102

Current page

103

Current page

104

Current page

105

Current page

106

Current page

107

Current page

108

Current page

109

Current page

110

Current page

111

Current page

112

Current page

113

Current page

114

Current page

115

Current page

116

Current page

117

Current page

118

Current page

119

Current page

120

Current page

121

Current page

122

Current page

123

Current page

124

Current page

125

Current page

126

Current page

127

Current page

128

Current page

129

Current page

130

Current page

131

Current page

132

Current page

133

Current page

134

Current page

135

Current page

136

Current page

137

Current page

138

Current page

139

Current page

140

Current page

141

Current page

142

Current page

143

Current page

144

Current page

145

Current page

146

Current page

147

Current page

148

Current page

149

Current page

150

Current page

151

Current page

152

Current page

153

Current page

154

Current page

155

Current page

156

Current page

157

Current page

158

Current page

159

Current page

160

Current page

161

Current page

162

Current page

163

Current page

164

Current page

165

Current page

166

Current page

167

Current page

168

Current page

169

Current page

170

Current page

171

Current page

172

Current page

173

Current page

174

Current page

175

Current page

176

Current page

177

Current page

178

Current page

179

Current page

180

Current page

181

Current page

182

Current page

183

Current page

184

Current page

185

Current page

186

Current page

187

Current page

188

Current page

189

FIA shows favouritism

Sir,

How can the FIA, and by inference ACCUS in the US, justify the suspended sentence given to Renault? After the punitive decision in the McLaren ‘Stepney-gate’ affair it seems clear that Renault, and obviously Ferrari, have received preferential treatment. Not only does Renault walk away with no penalty other than the threat of punishment (certainly a hollow one) should any similar incidents take place, but it keeps
the win in Singapore. Why is it allowed to stand? I’m sure Nico Rosberg, who was second in that race, supports the decision…

The FIA is a joke and, worse still, so is Formula 1. The goose is dead.

Locke de Bretteville, San Jose, California, USA

Was Ivy’s death avoidable?

Sir,

I would like to say how much I enjoyed being reminded of the exploits of Bill Ivy by Mat Oxley (October issue). I competed at the same time as Bill (in a different class) and couldn’t wait to watch him racing when I wasn’t.

I remember well seeing his foot bleeding after wearing his boot away on the Isle of Man and cornering with his bare foot.

Most of us were aware that his crash was caused by a seized engine, but Mat did not mention that Bill had a habit of removing his helmet after a race and resting it on the tank. If he’d been wearing the helmet the outcome of his accident might have been altogether different.

David Hunter, Nottingham

The story that Ivy had already undone his helmet when he crashed is well known, but I’ve spoken to riders and journalists who were at the Sachsenring that day and they believe it is incorrect. There was another story going about that he was cruising back to the pits with his left arm resting on the fuel tank, so couldn’t get to the clutch when the engine seized. But that too is unlikely, as far as I am aware; when a main bearing seizes you don’t get any warning, so it makes no difference whether your fingers are ready over the clutch lever. Mat Oxley

Attwood a delight in Dino

Sir,

I am sure you have been inundated with letters praising the Goodwood Revival and the wonderful people and machinery the event brings together every year.

For me the highlight this year has to be Richard Attwood’s drive in the Ferrari 246 Dino. I feel privileged to have witnessed a master craftsman at work.

Mr Attwood sir, it is with respect I raise my hat to you.

Graham Kiddy, Shudy Camps, Cambridge

Reviving happy memories

Sir,

I have just paid my first visit to the Goodwood Revival – in fact, my first to any race meeting since air horns destroyed the pleasure. A great day out, fab costumes, lots to see, nostalgia by the bucketload, wonderful sights, sounds and smells. Memories of a lost youth!

Observations: a high proportion of costumed spectators around the entrance and pits area, but a much lower percentage on the far side of the circuit. More interested in the racing?

Impressions: having stayed to ‘the bitter end’, my son and I were able to traverse the almost deserted terraces – and there was no litter!

We’ll make it two days next year.

Ken Faulkner, Paignton, Devon

Tracking technology

Sir,

Do you have Google Earth or Google Maps on your iPhone or computer? If so, here’s something useful to do with them over the winter: first, read Track Visit in Motor Sport; second, type in the name of a town into Google Maps or Google Earth; third, find and follow the track. Then find the track in a road atlas.

Of course this can be done for as many race tracks as you can remember, such as Rouen-les-Essarts, Reims, Chimay etc, and then if you are planning to drive through France, Belgium, Germany or Italy next summer you can programme your satnav and detour to these old circuits. There, and I bet you thought that you would never find a use for those applications.

David Fisher, Sutton-in-Ashfield, Notts

Bell the bike star

Sir,

It gave me great pleasure to read Lunch with… Derek Bell in the September issue.

From 1967 to ’79, I was employed in motor sport in South Africa. This afforded me the opportunity to meet and sometimes work with some of the world’s top race/rally drivers and navigators of the time. Names such as Hannu Mikkola, Roger Clark, Tony Pond, David Richards, Simo Lampinen and Frank Gardner readily spring to mind.

After 1979 I changed course by buying a motorcycle dealership, but still kept involved in motor sport by running my own team in local motorcycle production racing. I think it was at the end of 1984, after the Kyalami 1000Kms endurance race, that Stewart Pegg, who was also a riding companion, asked me if I could arrange a trail ride with bikes for Derek and his son Justin.

Trail riding involves riding off-road bikes down paths and trails through the bush. There is always some trepidation when you lend motorcycles to strangers as you never know how well or how often they ride. Derek and Justin showed me how much natural talent they both have by tackling any obstacles easily and at the same time always being prepared to be part of the group.

Derek had offered me a lap as a passenger in his Porsche 962 around Kyalami the following year. Alas, this never materialised as the political situation worsened here and international racing disappeared.

Derek, a gentleman to the core, has left me feeling privileged to have spent time with a great driver.

Incidentally, I was sad to hear that Frank Gardner had passed away recently. I did a Springbok Series with him. What a character, with a wealth of knowledge when it came to sorting out saloon cars.

Rupert Culwick, Sabie, Mpumalanga, S Africa

Nelson nearly knobbled…

Sir,

I’d like to draw your attention to page 50 of the November issue of Motor Sport in which Nelson Piquet Sr says, “Imagine, I nearly lost a championship because I lost my knob!”

Am I right in thinking that if Mr Piquet’s knob had fallen off permanently then Mr Massa might well have been World Champion in 2008?

Nick Chandler, Medstead, Hants