Lynx D-type: Sincere form of flattery

With Jaguar racers of genuine heritage fetching millions, Simon de Burton thinks a Lynx imitation might just be your type

Lynx D-type front

Built in 1973 by Lynx, this D-type holds five national endurance speed records

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Current page

53

Current page

54

Current page

55

Current page

56

Current page

57

Current page

58

Current page

59

Current page

60

Current page

61

Current page

62

Current page

63

Current page

64

Current page

65

Current page

66

Current page

67

Current page

68

Current page

69

Current page

70

Current page

71

Current page

72

Current page

73

Current page

74

Current page

75

Current page

76

Current page

77

Current page

78

Current page

79

Current page

80

Current page

81

Current page

82

Current page

83

Current page

84

Current page

85

Current page

86

Current page

87

Current page

88

Current page

89

Current page

90

Current page

91

Current page

92

Current page

93

Current page

94

Current page

95

Current page

96

Current page

97

Current page

98

Current page

99

Current page

100

Current page

101

Current page

102

Current page

103

Current page

104

Current page

105

Current page

106

Current page

107

Current page

108

Current page

109

Current page

110

Current page

111

Current page

112

Current page

113

Current page

114

Current page

115

Current page

116

Current page

117

Current page

118

Current page

119

Current page

120

Current page

121

Current page

122

Current page

123

Current page

124

Current page

125

Current page

126

Current page

127

Current page

128

Current page

129

Current page

130

Current page

131

Current page

132

Current page

133

Current page

134

Current page

135

Current page

136

Current page

137

Current page

138

Current page

139

Current page

140

Current page

141

Current page

142

Current page

143

Current page

144

Current page

145

Current page

146

Current page

147

Current page

148

Current page

149

Current page

150

Current page

151

Current page

152

Current page

153

Current page

154

Current page

155

Current page

156

Current page

157

Current page

158

Current page

159

Current page

160

Current page

161

Current page

162

Current page

163

Current page

164

Current page

165

Current page

166

Current page

167

Current page

168

Current page

169

Current page

170

Current page

171

Current page

172

Current page

173

Current page

174

Current page

175

Current page

176

Current page

177

Current page

178

Current page

179

Current page

180

Current page

181

Current page

182

Current page

183

Current page

184

Current page

185

Current page

186

Current page

187

Current page

188

Current page

189

Current page

190

Current page

191

Current page

192

Current page

193

Current page

194

Current page

195

Current page

196

Current page

197

Current page

198

Current page

199

Current page

200

Current page

201

Current page

202

Current page

203

Current page

204

The days when replica cars were largely looked down upon are long gone, not least since there are now so many superbly accurate and beautifully built examples available (including some from the very marques that made the originals).

But back in the early ’70s, Lynx Motors became one of the first firms to build truly high-end ‘continuations’ when it began the low-volume manufacture of its Lynx D-type.

The company was originally formed in 1968 by engineer Guy Black and architect Roger Ludgate in order to provide a repair, maintenance and restoration service for C, D and E-type Jaguars. But by 1972 experience gleaned from working one factory race cars led the pair to develop an accurate D-type replica based on the Le Mans winner of 1956.

A total of 53 examples of the original Lynx D-type were built, including nine in fin-less XKSS form, but perhaps the most famous is the car pictured here, the 17th produced and the very car that set several national endurance speed records at MIRA in 1987, all of which still stand.

Lynx D-type rear

Fitted with a 4.2-litre engine, 57 SAL has been kept in its record-breaking spec

In keeping with the car’s blue Ecurie Ecosse livery, the team that set them comprised three drivers from Scottish ackgrounds – grand prix star Innes Ireland, ladies rallying world champion Louise Aitken- Walker and hillclimb doyen Kenny Allen. Between them they managed no fewer than five records including 100km at an average of 138.11mph; 200km at 136.28mph; and to average 136.58mph over the course of one hour. Not bad going for a replica and worthy perhaps even of the original.

Still carrying its memorable registration mark 57 SAL, the aluminium-bodied, long- nose car is fitted with the same 4.2-litre engine with triple Weber carburettors and D-type valves and cams that helped it to secure its string of records. The famously authentic Lynx interior, meanwhile, is as beautifully patinated as the rest of the car, which Jaguar specialist CKL Developments fairly describes as “the most desirable Lynx D-type on the planet”. Said to be equally usable on both road and track, it is being offered with a hefty history file detailing its record-breaking exploits in correspondence, pictures and video.

With Lynx Motors now recently revived and future cars being built at Coventry MetalCraft (the site of the old Abbey Panels Jaguar XJ220 factory) an already strong market for these exceptional recreations is likely to become more buoyant.

And compared with the $21.7m achieved at auction four years ago by the actual D-type driven to victory at the ’56 Le Mans by Ron Flockhart and Ninian Sanderson, £295,000 looks like peanuts.

Well, these things are all relative…

1973 Lynx D-type

On sale with CKL, Battle, East Sussex, TN33 ORE. ckl.co.uk
Asking: £295,000


In the market for a real dedication?

OK, so they’re not originals. But we’re not millionaires, so they’ll have to do…

 

Shelby Daytona coupe1965 Shelby Daytona Coupe, 50th Anniversary

$239,950
Well, it says 1965, but it’s actually more like 2015. One of 50 continuation cars made to celebrate the Daytona’s 1965 world title.
hemmings.com

 

Lister-BellLister-Bell Stratos

From £40,000
With original Lancia Stratos as rare as F1 spectators, you’ll likely have to look to specialist creations instead. LB Specialist Cars can build one for a sensible price.
lbspecialistcars.com

 

AC Cobra2007 AC Cobra

£49,950
Known as a Magnum 427, this is one of just 70 beautiful Cobra recreations. It has a 302 Ford V8, a host of original parts and even imitation Halibrand Wheels.
simonabbottcars.co.uk

 

Icon Engineering 917Icon Engineering 917

From £200,000
What started out as a lucky find of an old 917 bodyshell blossomed into a full run of replicas. Powered by a 3.6-litre flat six these are fully road legal. Somehow…