The Editor, BROOKLANDS GAZETTE

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The Editor, THE BROOKLANDS GAZETTE. DEAR SIR,

I notice in the October issue of your Gazette, in the account of the interview that took place between Mr. Scott Hall and myself, a paragraph at the end which would almost lead me to suspect that perhaps you had not quite got hold of the idea I wished to convey.

What I meant by the expressed desire to please the owners of A.C. cars was not merely a question of giving them, as it were, idle pleasure, but what I had in mind was this—When a man buys a car from us, we regard him as having joined the happy family of A.C. Cars as a sort of sleeping partner, and we think that it is up to us to maintain the value of the purchase he has made in every shape and form, so that the second-hand value shall not decrease ; and this can only be done by maintaining the good name of the A.C. This can only be done by constant effort and research, and trials, races, and public performances are the outward and visible sign that we are able to present to the public of the progress we have made or are making.

It is true that practically every A.C. car that we make can reasonably hope to be a more desirable possession than the one that was made say three months ago, and this in turn helps our business, and as one might say, “makes the mare to go.” Mr. Scott Hall’ will readily appreciate that if this constant and unceasing improvement were not taking place in motor cars, probably it would be the only

exception in the whole world to the constant evolution and improvement which to-day has arranged that we all come to business in an erect position instead of on all fours, as the scientist would have us believe was the original mode of progression of our ancestors.

I suggest, therefore, that the policy enunciated could not be considered an absurd one by any reasonableminded man, but rather it is based on sound and convincing facts.

There is one other little error that has crept in, on page 18o of the same issue, with regard to the sixcylinder Sports Model. It states there that the Sports Model is guaranteed to do 8o m.p.h. In point of fact, we guarantee the chassis to do 85 m.p.h., and of course Mr. Scott Hall knows how difficult it is to put on the extra five miles.

For the rest, I should like to congratulate you on the production Of THE BROOKLANDS GAZETTE, which I consider a most interesting and convincing effort. Yours faithfully,

S. F. EDGE. [The final paragraph of our published interview with Mr. Edge was written in the hope of “drawing” him. We seem to have been successful.—ED.]