The D.H. Moth abroad

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The increasing number of manufacturing licences which have been granted by the de Havilland Aircraft Co. for the manufacture of both the Moth and the Gipsy engine abroad, affords an extremely interesting sidelight on the aircraft industry in Great Britain and an example of the extending world-wide use of English machines.

An agreement to manufacture the Gipsy Moth has just been concluded with the well-known firm of French aircraft constructors, MM. Aeroplanes Morane-Saulnier, and a similar agreement has been granted to the Norwegian Ministry of Defence.

Last year a licence was granted to the American, pioneer firm, The Wright Aeronautical Corporation, to manufacture the Gipsy engine and the American Moth is now being supplied by them with this type. The Moth Aircraft Corporation, U.S.A., who, for some time, have been in possession of the licence to manufacture the Moth aircraft, have now joined the Curtiss-Wright Group, the largest and most powerful aircraft constructors in the United States. The Finnish Government were the first to acquire the Moth manufacturing licence. A significant point is that in every country of its adoption the Moth has been chosen in preference to local types.